Swords into Plowshares: The Isaiah Scroll and Its Message of Peace
Until August 15, 2008
Summer Art Camps in the Youth Wing
Art Marathon 2008
For children who love art (Hebrew)
Real Time: Art in Israel 1998-2008
Until August 30
Signs of Life: Animating Ticho House
Until September 26
Orphaned Art: Looted Art from the Holocaust in the Israel Museum
Until August 23
The Shrine of the Book
Model of Jerusalem in the Second Temple Period
Youth Wing
Campus Renewal Project

Press Releases

Welcome to the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Israel's largest museum and leading cultural institution - and one of the world's great museum stories of the 20th century.

We invite you to enjoy an exciting program of exhibitions, family activities, and special events in the Shrine of the Book, the Model of Second Temple Jerusalem, the Weisbord Exhibition Pavilion, and the Ruth Youth Wing, and to experience the beauty of the Billy Rose Sculpture Garden. The Museum has recently begun a major campus renewal program and, while work is underway, our permanent collection galleries are not open to the public. These are exciting times in our Museum. We wish you an enjoyable visit, and we thank you for your continuing participation and support.

Contacts:
Israel Press Office
Tel: 02-670-8868
Fax: 02-670-8063

the israel museum, jerusalem
p.o. box 71117
jerusalem 91710

USA:
Resnicow Schroeder Associates, Inc.

Tel: 212-595-0515
Fax: 212-595-8354 

May 26, 2008
Signs of Life: Animating Ticho House

May 5, 2008
Israel Museum Presents Great Isaiah Scroll –
The Most Complete Biblical Dead Sea Scroll Ever Found –For the First Time in Over Forty Years


April 16, 2008
Israel Museum Presents Major Survey of
Contemporary Israeli Art over the Past Decade

March 24, 2008
The Israel Museum Announces the Winners of the 2008 Prizes in Art and Design

March 24, 2008
The Israel Museum Launches a New Website

March 18, 2008
Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany at the Israel Museum, 18.03.08

February 27, 2008 
New Exhibition at Home in Ticho House -
The Homes of Others: Video Art and Photography by Contemporary Israeli Artists on View from March 7 through May 14, 2008

February 6, 2008
Landmark Exhibition at Israel Museum
Explores Fate of Artworks Stolen in France during World War II

February 6, 2008
Orphaned Art:
Looted Art from the Holocaust in the Israel Museum


December 30, 2007
Landmark Exhibition at Israel Museum
Explores Fate of Artworks Stolen in France during World War II


December 30, 2007
Orphaned Art:
Looted Art from the Holocaust in the Israel Museum

November 14, 2007
The New Face of Ticho House:
The Israel Museum Invites Young Curators to Join the Dialogue


September 18, 2007 – March 1, 2008
Made in China: Contemporary Chinese Art at the Israel Museum

August 26, 2007
World War II Provenance Research Online

July 8, 2007
Ticho House: Hidden Cities by Yemima Ergas

June 24, 2007
Israel Museum Breaks Ground on Comprehensive Campus Project

June 24, 2007
Beliefs and Believers: Ancient Art from the Israel Museum

June 12, 2007
Ancient Art At the Rockefeller Museum

June 17, 2007
Water in Art and Life

May 30, 2007
The Israel Museum Acquires Contemporary Works by International Artists

May 21, 2007
Hebrew Manuscripts from the 600-Year "Silent Era"

May 6, 2007
Display of the “Heliodorus Stele”

April 26, ‏2007
Just Be Good to Me

March 28, ‏2007
EDEN: The longing for the east in the 19th century

March 15, ‏2007
Landscape of Longing: Avraham Ofek's Early and Late Works

 February 27– June 30, ‏2007
Surrealism and Beyond

January 18, ‏2007
Comeback: New Works by Hadas Ophrat

January 5, ‏2007
Dream Makers: Design Meets Technology

January 2, ‏2007
A Statement on the Death of Teddy Kollek

January 5, 2007
Dream Makers: Design Meets Technology

Press Releases -2006

Press Releases -2005

Press Releases -2004

Press Releases -2003

Press Releases -2002

Press Releases -2001


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Contemporary Israeli Artists Breathe
New Life into Ticho House

Signs of Life: Animating Ticho House on view from
June 1 – September 26, 2008 


Jerusalem, May 25, 2008 –  The Israel Museum, Jerusalem presents Signs of Life, an exhibition that seeks to animate Ticho House though works of art that whisper and move within its walls. “Animation” is interpreted not in the narrow sense of a cinematic medium, but in the broader sense of giving life to inanimate objects. The exhibition, curated by Mira Lapidot, features works in sculpture, video and animation, most of which exhibit movement. Together they revive Ticho House's forgotten corners and enliven its rooms.

The subject of Signs of Life is inspired by its setting: the house that was purchased by Dr. Albert and Anna Ticho and became their private home, as well as an eye clinic, a studio and a meeting place for Jerusalem’s artists and intellectuals. In addition to its function as art gallery and cultural center, Ticho House also acts as a monument to its former owners, freezing time at a certain moment and in this sense bringing life to a halt. The works in the exhibition relate to the house – its architecture and furnishings, the various functions it has served, and the collection of art and objects it contains – and appear to become part of it. And yet, none of them was created specifically for the venue or exhibition; all are existing artworks that were chosen because of their elusive qualities of movement and animation. In Ticho House they endow a place that is about memory and the past with new signs of life.

Among the works on display:

• Dror Daum’s Paper Work (Fire), a video work, features ribbons of red crepe paper tied to a grating in the sidewalk, so that the hot wind coming from below blows the ribbons in the air, giving them the appearance of flames in the street. Its placement in Ticho House – above the hearth – suggests the possibility of reigniting the fire in what was once a home full of warmth.

• Raaya Karas’s Some Place for Tomorrow, an animated film featuring the artist’s grandmother, today over 90 years old, reading a letter in German she wrote in March 1942 to her then fiancé after the war forced them to part. Karas does not set out to illustrate the events described in the letter, but rather presents a young woman – her grandmother – busy with domestic chores. The internal reality appears to well up in her and spill over, affecting external reality as well.

Ticho House

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.


 

Israel Museum Presents Great Isaiah Scroll – The Most Complete Biblical Dead Sea Scroll Ever Found – For the First Time in Over Forty Years

Swords into Plowshares: The Isaiah Scroll and Its Message of Peace 

On View from May 2008 in Honor of Israel's 60th Anniversary



Detail of the Isaiah Scroll found in Qumran. From the exhibition Swords into Plowshares

Jerusalem, May 5, 2008 – On the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the State of Israel, the Israel Museum presents two major sections of the Great Isaiah Scroll – the most complete biblical Dead Sea Scroll document ever found and one of the world’s greatest archaelogical treasures – in a special installation in the Shrine of the Book. For the first time in over forty years, the public will have the rare opportunity to view the two longest sections of the Scroll, featuring Isaiah’s celebrated message of peace: "They shall beat their swords into plowshares…" (Isaiah 2:4). In order to illustrate this important message, artifacts from the days of the prophet Isaiah (8th century BCE), including a bent scimitar and agricultural tools, will be displayed together with the Scroll as part of this special exhibit. Swords into Plowshares: The Isaiah Scroll and Its Message of Peace will be on view in the Shrine of the Book at the Museum from May 19 through August 30, 2008.

“This special installation, held in celebration of Israel’s 60th anniversary, provides visitors with a rare opportunity to view one of the oldest, most complete, and best preserved of the Dead Sea Scrolls,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “The Isaiah Scroll, housed at the Israel Museum in the Shrine of the Book, with its timeless message of peace, is one of the most important ancient biblical documents ever discovered.”

Swords into Plowshares presents the longest sections of the complete Isaiah Scroll: a 2.60 meter-long section comprising chapters 1-28, and a 2.38 meter-long section comprising chapters 44-66. Contextualizing the scroll, the Museum will also display ancient archaeological tools, including a bent scimitar and a newly excavated and never before displayed early Roman seal, depicting a dove-like bird carrying an olive branch. The exhibit is curated by Michal Dayagi-Mendels, Chief Curator of Archaeology, and Adolfo Roitman, Head of the Shrine of the Book and Curator of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

The Great Isaiah Scroll

The Isaiah Scroll (Manuscript A) is one of the first seven scrolls discovered in 1947 in a cave near Qumran, on the northwestern shores of the Dead Sea. Of the 220 biblical scrolls found in the area, the complete Great Isaiah Scroll is one of the best preserved and the only one containing an entire biblical book. Dating from approximately 120 BCE, it is also one of the oldest Dead Sea Scrolls, some one thousand years older than the oldest manuscripts of the Bible known to us before the Scrolls’ discovery. The version of the text is close to the masoretic version found in medieval codices, among them the Aleppo Codex, which is also permanently held and regularly displayed in the Shrine of the Book. Unlike most of the biblical scrolls from Qumran, it exhibits “popular” spelling, shedding light on how Hebrew was pronounced during the Second Temple period. The prominence of the Book of Isaiah is consistent with the messianic beliefs of the community living at Qumran, since Isaiah is known for his prophecies concerning the End of Days.

The complete Isaiah Scroll was briefly on display at the Israel Museum from 1965-67, as part of the original design conception for the Shrine of the Book. Since that time, due to conservation requirements aimed at the Scrolls' long-term preservation, Scroll sections are rotated on a regular basis in the Shrine, and the architects' original design intention is demonstrated through a facsimile. Swords into Plowshares represents the first time since their appearance in the 1960s that the two longest sections will be on public view.

From Weapons of War to Agricultural Tools

In the days of Isaiah, both weapons and agricultural tools were made from the same material: cast iron, the “steel” of ancient times. These implements were much stronger than their bronze and wooden counterparts used customarily before the 8th Century CE. The agricultural tools displayed in Swords into Plowshares, dating from Isaiah’s times, reflect the popular choice of peace through the production of plowshares and pruning hooks over swords and spears. As is written in the Book of Kings: “Judah and Israel dwelt in safety, everyone under his own vine and under his own fig tree” (1 Kings 5:5).

Swords into Plowshares also presents a scimitar intentionally bent in antiquity to symbolize the death of the warrior who had used it and in whose tomb it was buried. During the historic visit in 1977 of the former president of Egypt, Anwar Sadat, to Israel, the former prime minister of Israel, Menahem Begin, presented the Egyptian leader with a replica of this sword as a token of peace in the region.

Celebrating Sixty Years of Discovery

Coinciding with this display, the Israel Museum will hold a major academic conference on July 6-8, 2008, celebrating sixty years since the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, with participating experts from Israel and worldwide. The sessions planned for this three-day conference focus on such themes as: life in Qumran, biblical interpretation, scientific and cultural approaches to the Scrolls, language and Qumran literature, and the Scrolls as an educational tool. The conference is sponsored by the Dorot Foundation and the Nussia and Andre Aisenstadt Foundation, in collaboration with the Orion Center at Hebrew University.

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Israel Museum Presents Major Survey of
Contemporary Israeli Art over the Past Decade

Celebrating Israel's 60th Anniversary, Real Time: Art in Israel 1998-2008 is on View from April 30 through August 30, 2008

Jerusalem, April 15, 2008 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, presents a comprehensive survey of contemporary Israeli creativity from the past ten years, tackling what many consider to be the most dynamic decade in the development of modern Israel’s visual culture.  Real Time: Art in Israel 1998-2008 explores the ways in which emerging artists have responded to local and global developments during this period and highlights the notably growing international profile of Israeli artists. The exhibition showcases a selection of some sixty works in a range of traditional and new mediums by forty artists, among them Guy Ben-Ner, Sigalit Landau, Adi Nes, Yehudit Sasportas, Eliezer Sonnenschein and Gal Weinstein. Real Time marks the Israel Museum’s contribution to the celebration of the 60th anniversary of the State.

"Real Time explores the ways in which Israel’s young artists have engaged with the growing phenomenon of the global artistic village,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. "These emerging talents are responding to the reality around them, both locally and internationally, without being bound by their immediate historical, cultural, and socio-political experiences.”
 
Bringing together works by major artists, all of whom have made their mark on the Israeli art scene within the last ten years. Real Time highlights the resonances between local issues and the broader spectrum of global influences. In Israel, this period is remembered for momentous world events, such as the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the war in Iraq, as well as local ones, such as the outbreak of the Second Intifada, disengagement from Gaza, and the Second Lebanon War. While little of this art responds directly to these events, some of the works in Real Time express a dread of global catastrophe, alongside a yearning for escape to distant borders – real or imagined – as a kind of indirect response. Others envision fantastic, mythological worlds and wild, primordial, and sublime landscapes.

For contemporary Israeli artists, the focus of their work increasingly is not Israel itself, but rather the larger global landscape. Nor does it necessarily connect with Judaism or Israeliness. Artists who deal more directly with life in Israel today are nonetheless also stretching their local focus to engage with a wider contextual vocabulary in which the daily experience of real time is overtaken by the more cosmic attributes of myth, bible, and religion.

Highlighted works include:
Sigalit Landau’s large-scale sculptures from Dining Hall (2007), newly premiered at Kunst-Werke - Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin, which explore Landau’s powerful – and even beautiful – vision of the End of Days.

Ohad Meromi’s The Boy from South Tel Aviv (2001), a monumentally scaled sculpture of a adolescent African boy whose sheer presence forces the viewer to confront questions of the place of third-world guests working in Western society and the dissonance between the poverty of refugee life and the contrasting comfort of museums as sanctuaries of art.
Eliezer Sonnenschein's Landscape and Jerusalem (2007), an intricately detailed painting that employs motifs drawn from Christianity and mythology, as well as grotesque, surrealistic, and sexual imagery in a Hieronymus Bosch-like tapestry of future foreboding.

Sixty Years of Art in Israel
The Israel Museum presents Real Time: Art in Israel 1998-2008 as part of a larger cooperative initiative of six of Israel’s museums, celebrating the 60th anniversary of Statehood and each highlighting the artistic output of a different decade in Israel’s history. This groundbreaking project reveals the creativity and diversity of Israeli art, which in recent years has emerged with increasing visibility on the global artistic landscape.  Participating in the project, together with the Israel Museum, are the Ashdod Museum of Art, Ein Harod Museum of Art, Haifa Museum of Art, Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art, and Tel Aviv Museum of Art. Real Time inaugurates this landmark initiative.

Publications
Each of the exhibitions in the Sixty Years of Art in Israel series is accompanied by an illustrated catalogue. Real Time comprises a 200-page publication with fifty full-color images, published by the Israel Museum and edited by exhibition co-curator Amitai Mendelsohn. See the exhibition website.

Program Organization and Credit
Real Time: Art in Israel 1998-2008 is directed by Amitai Mendelsohn, David Orgler Curator of Israeli Art at the Israel Museum, and Guest Curator Efrat Natan. The exhibition is made possible through the generosity of: the Sam Weisbord Trust, Beverly Hills, California; the Palm Beach Friends of the Israel Museum; Steven Chernys, Fort Lauderdale, Florida; and the donors to the Israel Museum’s 2008 Exhibition Fund: Melva Bucksbaum and Raymond J. Learsy, Aspen, Colorado; Ruth and Leon Davidoff, Paris and Mexico City; Hanno D. Mott, New York; and the Nash Family Foundation, New York.

The Sixty Years of Art in Israel series is made possible by the Ministry of Science, Culture and Sport, Culture Administration, with support from the 60th Anniversary Celebration Headquarters and additional support from the Israeli Center for Libraries.

To the online exhibition 


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The Israel Museum Announces the Winners of the 2008 Prizes in Art and Design

Jerusalem, is conferring its Prizes in Art and Design for 2008 on Wednesday, April 2, at 8 pm at Ticho House.
This year's winners – 16 in total – will be awarded the Israel Museum's prestigious prizes in a variety of categories.

The Sandberg Prize for Israeli Art: Guy Ben-Ner

The IDB Group Prize for an Israeli Artist: Tamar Raban

The Beatrice S. Kolliner Award for a Young Israeli Artist: Shahar Marcus

The Enrique Kavlin Photography Prize: Reuven Milon, David Harris

The Gérard Lévy Prize for Research and Development: Gaston Zvi Ickowicz

The Sandberg Grant for Research and Development: Yaara Rosner and Ido Bruno

The Crate and Barrel Israeli Product Design Award for the Home and Its Surroundings: Tal Gur, Na'ama and Assaf Varshavski, Segol Design
Student category: Esti Bortz, Gilli Kuchik, Gilad Zaafrany

The Jacob Pins Award for Israeli Printmaking Artist: Asaph Ben Menahem

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The Israel Museum Launches a New Website

Features include virtual interactive tours, two complete Dead Sea Scrolls, a photo and video diary of the campus renewal project, and World War II provenance research online.

Jerusalem, March 24, 2008 –  The Israel Museum, Jerusalem announces the launching of its new website. The website aims to showcase, in an innovative way, the beauty of the Museum campus, its many collections and resources, and the variety of the exhibition and event program at the Israel Museum and its off-site venues, Ticho House and the Rockefeller Museum.

Inspired by the same white cube ideology emblematic of early Modernism that inspired the architecture of the Museum itself, the website's design is simple and geometric, and seems to expand organically during browsing. Clicking on the tabs surrounding the home page "cube" take the browser to the Museum's wings and collections, an event calendar, online information and research services, exhibition schedule, off-site venues, and Museum shop, to name some locations. Exciting new and updated features include virtual interactive tours of the Shrine of the Book and the Model of Second Temple Jerusalem, the complete digital Great Isaiah Scroll and Temple Scroll that can be rolled and unrolled, detailed information and images of thousands of masterpieces of the Museum's collections, updates on the campus renewal project via photo and video coverage, exhibition information in Russian and French, and the World War II provenance search engine for researching the works of art and Judaica looted during the Holocaust currently under the custodianship of the Israel Museum. 

The Israel Museum website was made possible through the generosity of  the Arkin Foundation. The website was developed by an in-house team directed by Doron Eisenhamer, Manager of Computer and Information Systems Department, and Susan Hazan, Curator of New Media and Head of Internet Office. The team includes Ehab Jallad, webmaster; Haya Sheffer, web design, Ruth Lokshin, English editor; and Hanna Braunschvig, Hebrew translator and editor; with additional assistance from BSmart Web Applications.

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Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany at the Israel Museum, 18.03.08


James Snyder and Angela Merkel at the Second Temple Model



James Snyder  and Angela Merkel at the Shrine of the Book

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New Exhibition at Home in Ticho House

The Homes of Others: Video Art and Photography by Contemporary Israeli Artists on View from March 7 through May 14, 2008

Jerusalem, February 27, 2008 - The Ticho House presents an exhibition that explores, through photography and video art, the emotional echoes in homes whose occupants are absent. Viewing these works in Ticho House, once a private home itself, amplifies the resonance and joins our experience to that of the artists who have entered the homes of others. The exhibition includes works by Uri Gershuni, Noa Gross, Dana Levy, Ruti Nemet, Aya Ben Ron, Pavel Wolberg and Yuval Yairi. Homes of Others is curated by Aya Miron.

Some of the works in the exhibition deal with homes whose inhabitants have died and focus on the memories, whether real or imagined, that pervade the emotionally charged spaces. In others, the artists’ voyeuristic gaze invades inhabited dwellings whose owners are not at home. The repeated intrusion of a stranger’s camera into the home of another raises some of the basic ethical issues that lie at the heart of the photographic act. The inhabitants' absence, the intrusion of the camera and the way in which other people's homes are simultaneously familiar and alien – all of these contribute to the emotional tension at the core of the show.

 

The Artists

Noa Gross photographed homes in which she is employed as a cleaner. As part of the exhibition, she also cleaned the upper, once-residential, floor of Ticho House, and this video explores the reactions of visitors who were present at the time. Dana Levy filmed the endless creation, disintegration and regeneration of a tree house to produce a video work entitled . Uri Gershuni photographed the home of his father, the eminent painter Moshe Gershuni, after adding cyclamen plants that allude to his father’s artistic legacy. Yuval Yairi created a photographic mosaic of the Jerusalem Hansen’s disease hospital, once commonly known as the Leper House and regarded as a mysterious, frightening place. The windswept apartment in Ruti Nemet’s series of images seems to have been abandoned in haste. Pavel Wolberg accompanied an IDF unit into Jenin and photographed soldiers who had taken over a private home. Aya Ben Ron’s video is screened on the upper floor, where Dr. Albert and Anna Ticho lived, adjacent to Dr. Ticho’s study. Like Ticho House, the space filmed by Ben Ron served as both a home and a clinic – the gynecology clinic of the artist’s grandmother and the scene of intimate and dramatic moments in her family and in the lives of women from the Haifa area.

Ticho House 

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.


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Landmark Exhibition at Israel Museum
Explores Fate of Artworks Stolen in France during World War II

Looking for Owners: Custody, Research, and Restitution of Art Stolen in France during World War II on View from February 19 through June 3, 2008

Jerusalem, February 6, 2008 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, presents Looking for Owners: Custody, Research, and Restitution of Art Stolen in France during World War II, an exhibition tracing the story of works of art looted by Nazi forces in France during the Second World War. Organized by the French Ministry of Culture and Communication, the French Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs, the Direction des musées de France and the Réunion des musées nationaux, in collaboration with The Israel Museum, this landmark exhibition draws from the collection of works of art in France known as Musées Nationaux Récupération (MNR).

On view from February 19 through June 3, 2008, Looking for Owners brings together more than fifty paintings to explore the complex history behind the MNR holdings, with specific focus on the progress over the last ten years in tracing rightful ownership. The exhibition features the work of major European artists, including Eugène Delacroix, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Claude Monet, and Georges Seurat.

Approximately 60,000 objects that were taken from France and brought to Germany during World War II, either through looting or commercial transactions, were repatriated to France after the war. Of these, 2,000 objects that could not be restituted due to a lack of clear ownership history or because they had not been looted, were given in custody to the French National Museums. Today they are stored or exhibited in museums throughout France, including the Louvre, Musée d'Orsay, and Centre Georges-Pompidou, and the French government continues active provenance research and restitution efforts. To help illuminate this ongoing process, the Mattéoli Commission, formed in 1997 by then-Prime Minister Alain Juppé to study the matter of Jewish property restitution in France, recommended an exhibition of MNR works at the Israel Museum at the appropriate time.

“There has been much misunderstanding about the history of works taken during World War II and the efforts relating to their recovery following the war,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “This is an unprecedented opportunity to present the history of MNR for our audience in Israel, together with the ongoing research that has been done to help advance the process of restitution in France.” 

Looking for Owners features fifty-three works from the MNR collection presented in several categories, including: works looted from unknown owners, works stolen from Jewish families that were returned following the war and subsequently re-gifted to or purchased by the State; unprovenanced works; works involved in transactions with the Nazis; and works bought in the French art market by German museums and private individuals during the war.

The Looting of Art during World War II

Before the beginning of World War II, Adolf Hitler declared his wish to transform his hometown of Linz, Austria, into the Third Reich’s art capital, where all of the treasures of Europe would be exhibited. As a means to this end, Hitler recruited leading art experts to compile a secret “wish list” of works of art by so-called Aryan masters or works that had left German collections after the year 1500, to be “repatriated” to Germany. Plundering of public and private property, and especially of Jewish property, began in 1938 and reached a climax with the Final Solution. Major art collections were confiscated systematically throughout Europe, accompanied by other forms of looting, which included theft of works by Nazi soldiers and officers to give as gifts or for their own private collections, as well as forced sales of inventories from prominent art dealers.

At the end of the war a staggering volume of artworks, books, archival materials, and other cultural artifacts was discovered in hiding places throughout Germany and Austria – in depots, salt mines, castles, museum storerooms, and even private homes – and the arduous task of locating rightful owners and returning treasures to their owners or legitimate heirs began. Looking for Owners reflects aspects of this ongoing effort.

Publications

An online list of the MNR collection was posted in November 1996 by the Museums Department of the French Ministry of Culture and Communication (www.culture.gouv.fr). In 2004, the Réunion des Musées Nationaux published a catalogue of MNR paintings. In conjunction with Looking for Owners, an illustrated catalogue will be published in French and English.

Program Organization and Credits

Looking for Owners: Custody, Research, and Restitution of Art Stolen in France during World War II is organized by the French Ministry of Culture and Communication, the French Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs, the Direction des musées de France and the Réunion des musées nationaux, in collaboration with The Israel Museum. It is curated by Isabelle le Masne de Chermont, Curator-at-large at the Museums Department; Vincent Pomarède, Head of the Paintings Department at the Louvre; Laurence Sigal, Director of the Musée d’art et d’histoire du Judaïsme in Paris; and Didier Schulmann, Curator-at-large at the Musée national d’art moderne (Centre Georges-Pompidou); in collaboration with Shlomit Steinberg, Hans Dichand Curator of European Art at the Israel Museum.

The exhibition is made possible through the generosity of: Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert, New York; and the donors to the Israel Museum’s 2008 Exhibition Fund: Melva Bucksbaum and Raymond J. Learsy, Aspen, Colorado; Ruth and Leon Davidoff, Paris and Mexico City; Hanno D. Mott, New York; and the Nash Family Foundation, New York.

The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
The Israel Museum is the largest cultural institution in the State of Israel and is ranked among the leading art and archaeology museums in the world. Founded in 1965, the Museum houses encyclopedic collections ranging from prehistory through contemporary art. They include the world's most extensive holdings of Biblical and Holy Land archaeology, among them the Dead Sea Scrolls. In just over forty years, the Museum has built a far-ranging collection of nearly 500,000 objects through an unparalleled legacy of gifts and support from its circle of patrons worldwide. It has established itself as an internationally valued institution and a singularly rich cultural resource for Israel, the Middle East, and the world.

For more information please contact the foreign press officers above and :

Mariam Diallo, Press Counselor
The French Embassy in Israel
[email protected]
972.3.520.8303

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Orphaned Art:
Looted Art from the Holocaust in the Israel Museum

On View from February 19 through June 3, 2008
Jerusalem, February 6, 2008 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, presents Orphaned Art: Looted Art from the Holocaust in the Israel Museum, an exhibition exploring the fate of  works of art looted during World War II that were subsequently brought to Israel. Culled from 1,200 such works held in custody by the Israel Museum, all of which lack clear ownership history, Orphaned Art features over fifty paintings, drawings, prints, and books, together with a selection of Jewish ceremonial objects, and includes such artists as Jan Both, Moritz Daniel Oppenheim, Marc Chagall, Egon Schiele, and Alfred Sisley.

On view from February 19 through June 3, 2008, Orphaned Art presents a companion story to Looking for Owners: Custody, Research, and Restitution of Art Stolen in France during World War II, an exhibition on view concurrently at the Israel Museum that is drawn from the collection of stolen art in France known as Musées Nationaux Récupération (MNR).

“Orphaned Art offers an important opportunity to explore one dimension of the story of art looted during World War II, focusing specifically on those works whose histories vanished completely and which arrived in Israel during the early 1950s,” said James S. Snyder, the Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “In presenting this exhibition concurrently with Looking for Owners, we hope to illuminate the range of ongoing efforts to conclude the saga of lost art and artifacts of World War II and to highlight the shared significance of this process within the international museum community.”

In 1948, works of art and Judaica that were identified as having been looted from Jews or Jewish communities but were heirless and unclaimed were released from their central collecting points in Germany and given to the Jewish Restitution Successor Organization (JRSO). JRSO subsequently undertook a systematic program to distribute these orphaned objects among museums, synagogues, and other Jewish organizations in Israel and worldwide through the Jewish Cultural Reconstruction (JCR). Some of these objects were deposited for safekeeping at the Bezalel National Museum, predecessor to the Israel Museum, which, following its establishment in 1965, became the custodian of some 250 paintings, 250 works on paper, and 700 objects of Judaica, all received through JRSO-JCR.

Most of the JRSO works that arrived at the Israel Museum had no prior ownership history or basic catalogue information, and many came in poor condition, making conservation, restoration, and research an extensive undertaking, which is ongoing today. While these works have great emotional and sentimental value, many are of lesser art historical importance. At the same time, objects of significant artistic quality have been displayed regularly in the Museum’s galleries and exhibited and published worldwide. Beginning as early as 1950, individuals have come forward to claim JRSO works, with the most recent claims honored in 2006 and 2007.

Orphaned Art, organized by the Israel Museum, is part of the continuing cooperation between the Museum and the Company for Location and Restitution of Holocaust Victims' Assets, which acts to locate the property of victims of the Holocaust and return it to their heirs.

The Looting of Art during World War II

Before the beginning of World War II, Adolf Hitler declared his wish to transform his hometown of Linz, Austria, into the Third Reich’s art capital, where all of the treasures of Europe would be exhibited. As a means to this end, Hitler recruited leading art experts to compile a secret “wish list” of works of art by so-called Aryan masters or works that had left German collections after the year 1500, to be “repatriated” to Germany. Plundering of public and private property, and especially of Jewish property, began in 1938 and reached a climax with the Final Solution. Major art collections were confiscated systematically throughout Europe, accompanied by other forms of looting, which included theft of works by Nazi soldiers and officers to give as gifts or for their own private collections, as well as forced sales of inventories from prominent art dealers.

At the end of the war a staggering volume of artworks, books, archival materials, and other cultural artifacts was discovered in hiding places throughout Germany and Austria – in depots, salt mines, castles, museum storerooms, and even private homes – and the arduous task of relocating rightful owners and returning treasures to their owners or legitimate heirs began. Orphaned Art and Looking for Owners reflect aspects of this ongoing effort.

Publications

A fully detailed and illustrated online catalogue of all of the JRSO works in custody of  the Israel Museum can be found in a special section of the Museum’s website (www.imj.org.il), titled World War II Provenance Research Online. The catalog can be accessed via a direct link on the website of the Company for Location and Restitution of Holocaust Victims' Assets (www.hashava.co.il), which provides a list of assets of victims of the Holocaust and through which claims to recover lost property may be submitted. In conjunction with Orphaned Art, an illustrated catalogue will be published in English and Hebrew.

Program Organization and Credits
 
Orphaned Art is organized by the Israel Museum and curated by Shlomit Steinberg, Hans Dichand Curator of European Art at the Israel Museum.

The exhibition is made possible through the generosity of Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert, New York, and the donors to the Israel Museum’s 2008 Exhibition Fund: Melva Bucksbaum and Raymond J. Learsy, Aspen, Colorado; Ruth and Leon Davidoff, Paris and Mexico City; Hanno D. Mott, New York; and the Nash Family Foundation, New York.


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Landmark Exhibition at Israel Museum
Explores Fate of Artworks Stolen in France during World War II

Looking for Owners: Custody, Research, and Restitution of Art Stolen in France during World War II on View from February 19 through June 3, 2008

Jerusalem, December 30, 2007 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, presents Looking for Owners: Custody, Research, and Restitution of Art Stolen in France during World War II, an exhibition tracing the story of works of art looted by Nazi forces in France during the Second World War. Organized by the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Ministry of Culture and Communication, in collaboration with the Israel Museum, this landmark exhibition draws from the collection of works of art in France known as Musées Nationaux Récupération (MNR).

On view from February 19 through June 3, 2008, Looking for Owners brings together more than fifty paintings to explore the complex history behind the MNR holdings, with specific focus on the progress over the last ten years in tracing rightful ownership. The exhibition features the work of major European artists, including Eugène Delacroix, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Claude Monet, and Georges Seurat.

Approximately 60,000 objects that were taken from France and brought to Germany during World War II, either through looting or commercial transactions, were repatriated to France after the war. Of these, 2,000 objects that could not be restituted due to a lack of clear ownership history or because they had not been looted, were given in custody to the French National Museums. Today they are stored or exhibited in museums throughout France, including the Louvre, Musée d'Orsay, and Centre Georges-Pompidou, and the French government continues active provenance research and restitution efforts. To help illuminate this ongoing process, the Mattéoli Commission, formed in 1997 by then-Prime Minister Alain Juppé to study the matter of Jewish property restitution in France, recommended an exhibition of MNR works at the Israel Museum at the appropriate time.

“There has been much misunderstanding about the history of works taken during World War II and the efforts relating to their recovery following the war,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “This is an unprecedented opportunity to present the history of MNR for our audience in Israel, together with the ongoing research that has been done to help advance the process of restitution in France.” 

Looking for Owners features fifty-three works from the MNR collection presented in several categories, including: works looted from unknown owners, works stolen from Jewish families that were returned following the war and subsequently re-gifted to or purchased by the State; unprovenanced works; works involved in transactions with the Nazis; and works bought in the French art market by German museums and private individuals during the war.

The Looting of Art during World War II

Before the beginning of World War II, Adolf Hitler declared his wish to transform his hometown of Linz, Austria, into the Third Reich’s art capital, where all of the treasures of Europe would be exhibited. As a means to this end, Hitler recruited leading art experts to compile a secret “wish list” of works of art by so-called Aryan masters or works that had left German collections after the year 1500, to be “repatriated” to Germany. Plundering of public and private property, and especially of Jewish property, began in 1938 and reached a climax with the Final Solution. Major art collections were confiscated systematically throughout Europe, accompanied by other forms of looting, which included theft of works by Nazi soldiers and officers to give as gifts or for their own private collections, as well as forced sales of inventories from prominent art dealers.

At the end of the war a staggering volume of artworks, books, archival materials, and other cultural artifacts was discovered in hiding places throughout Germany and Austria – in depots, salt mines, castles, museum storerooms, and even private homes – and the arduous task of locating rightful owners and returning treasures to their owners or legitimate heirs began. Looking for Owners reflects aspects of this ongoing effort.

Publications

An online list of the MNR collection was posted in November 1996 by the Museums Department of the French Ministry of Culture and Communication (www.culture.gouv.fr). In 2004, the Réunion des Musées Nationaux published a catalogue of MNR paintings. In conjunction with Looking for Owners, an illustrated catalogue will be published in French and English.

Program Organization

Looking for Owners: Custody, Research, and Restitution of Art Stolen in France during World War II is organized by the Museums of France, in collaboration with the Israel Museum. It is curated by Isabelle le Masne de Chermont, Curator-at-large at the Museums Department; Vincent Pomarède, Head of the Paintings Department at the Louvre; Laurence Sigal, Director of the Musée d’art et d’histoire du Judaïsme in Paris; and Didier Schulmann, Curator-at-large at the Musée national d’art moderne (Centre Georges-Pompidou); in collaboration with Shlomit Steinberg, Hans Dichand Curator of European Art at the Israel Museum.  

Dena Scher, Foreign Press Officer   
The Israel Museum, Jerusalem   
[email protected]     
972.2.670.8935                           

Juliet Sorce / Christina French Houghton
Resnicow Schroeder Associates, New York
jsorce / [email protected]
212.671.5158 / 5162

Mariam Diallo, Press Counselor
The French Embassy in Israel
[email protected]
972.3.520.8303

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Orphaned Art:
Looted Art from the Holocaust in the Israel Museum

On View from February 19 through June 3, 2008

Jerusalem, December 30, 2007 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, presents Orphaned Art: Looted Art from the Holocaust in the Israel Museum, an exhibition exploring the fate of  works of art looted during World War II that were subsequently brought to Israel. Culled from 1,200 such works held in custody by the Israel Museum, all of which lack clear ownership history, Orphaned Art features over fifty paintings, drawings, prints, and books, together with a selection of Jewish ceremonial objects, and includes such artists as Jan Both, Moritz Daniel Oppenheim, Marc Chagall, Egon Schiele, and Alfred Sisley.

On view from February 19 through June 3, 2008, Orphaned Art presents a companion story to Looking for Owners: Custody, Research, and Restitution of Art Stolen in France during World War II, an exhibition on view concurrently at the Israel Museum that is drawn from the collection of stolen art in France known as Musées Nationaux Récupération (MNR).

“Orphaned Art offers an important opportunity to explore one dimension of the story of art looted during World War II, focusing specifically on those works whose histories vanished completely and which arrived in Israel during the early 1950s,” said James S. Snyder, the Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “In presenting this exhibition concurrently with Looking for Owners, we hope to illuminate the range of ongoing efforts to conclude the saga of lost art and artifacts of World War II and to highlight the shared significance of this process within the international museum community.”

In 1948, works of art and Judaica that were identified as having been looted from Jews or Jewish communities but were heirless and unclaimed were released from their central collecting points in Germany and given to the Jewish Restitution Successor Organization (JRSO). JRSO subsequently undertook a systematic program to distribute these orphaned objects among museums, synagogues, and other Jewish organizations in Israel and worldwide through the Jewish Cultural Reconstruction (JCR). Some of these objects were deposited for safekeeping at the Bezalel National Museum, predecessor to the Israel Museum, which, following its establishment in 1965, became the custodian of some 250 paintings, 250 works on paper, and 700 objects of Judaica, all received through JRSO-JCR.

Most of the JRSO works that arrived at the Israel Museum had no prior ownership history or basic catalogue information, and many came in poor condition, making conservation, restoration, and research an extensive undertaking, which is ongoing today. While these works have great emotional and sentimental value, many are of lesser art historical importance. At the same time, objects of significant artistic quality have been displayed regularly in the Museum’s galleries and exhibited and published worldwide. Beginning as early as 1950, individuals have come forward to claim JRSO works, with the most recent claims honored in 2006 and 2007.

The Looting of Art during World War II

Before the beginning of World War II, Adolf Hitler declared his wish to transform his hometown of Linz, Austria, into the Third Reich’s art capital, where all of the treasures of Europe would be exhibited. As a means to this end, Hitler recruited leading art experts to compile a secret “wish list” of works of art by so-called Aryan masters or works that had left German collections after the year 1500, to be “repatriated” to Germany. Plundering of public and private property, and especially of Jewish property, began in 1938 and reached a climax with the Final Solution. Major art collections were confiscated systematically throughout Europe, accompanied by other forms of looting, which included theft of works by Nazi soldiers and officers to give as gifts or for their own private collections, as well as forced sales of inventories from prominent art dealers.

At the end of the war a staggering volume of artworks, books, archival materials, and other cultural artifacts was discovered in hiding places throughout Germany and Austria – in depots, salt mines, castles, museum storerooms, and even private homes – and the arduous task of relocating rightful owners and returning treasures to their owners or legitimate heirs began. Orphaned Art and Looking for Art reflect aspects of this ongoing effort.

Publications

A fully detailed and illustrated online catalogue of all of the JRSO works in custody of  the Israel Museum can be found in a special section of the Museum’s website (JRSO), titled World War II Provenance Research Online. In conjunction with Orphaned Art, an illustrated catalogue will be published in English and Hebrew.

Program Organization
 
Orphaned Art is organized by the Israel Museum and curated by Shlomit Steinberg, Hans Dichand Curator of European Art at the Israel Museum.


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Made in China:
Contemporary Chinese Art at the Israel Museum

Over 100 works from the Estella Collection on view September 18, 2007 – March 1, 2008


Jerusalem, August 28, 2007 – Six years after the success of its China: One Hundred Treasures exhibition in 2001, which displayed Chinese treasures covering 5,000 years, from neolithic bronzes to Ming porcelains, the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, presents the newest chapter in the history of Chinese art. Made in China: Contemporary Art from the Estella Collection includes both established artists and rising stars from the world of international contemporary art, among them: Ai Weiwei, Chen Shaoxiong, Huang Yan, Ma Liuming, Qiu Zhijie, Wang Ningde, Zhang Huan and Zhang Xiaogang.

The Estella Collection from New York is one of the world's largest and most comprehensive collections of contemporary Chinese art. The fifty-seven artists in the exhibition were born in the years before, during or immediately after the Cultural Revolution (1966-76), and the highly politicized climate of that period, together with the tragedy of Tiananmen Square in 1989, were formative for their art. While some of these artists work and live in China, many are members of China's artistic diaspora, living in the US, Europe and Australia. The works displayed in the exhibition use a wide range of medums, including painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, video, installation and performance art.

"The incredible variety of expression reflected in the works of these artists attests to the fertile creativity that can emerge from any sociopolitical setting," states Museum director James S. Snyder. "Each work in this exhibition reflects the dialogue between the artist and the issues emerging from life in China during this dramatically transforming time."

The Mao Legacy
The legacy of Chairman Mao pervades the work of many artists in the post-Mao era. Although thirty years have passed since his death, Mao's incalculable influence on contemporary Chinese culture and the imprint of his image on Chinese society's collective memory continue to be felt. During Mao's time, artistic creativity was subjected to official oversight and was mandated to serve social and societal objectives of the state. The glorification of the worker, the soldier and particularly Mao himself, was typical of the social-realist style of the time and served to enhance Mao's popular profile. Images of Mao were mass-produced throughout the years of the Cultural Revolution. Several works in Made in China respond to this cult of image and personality: Yue Minjun's Liu Chunhua – Chairman Mao Goes to Anyuan takes one of the most widely reproduced images of Mao, set against a typical Chinese landscape, and removes Mao himself, leaving only the landscape; Legacy Mantle, a sculpture by Sui Jianguo, presents the Chairman's jacket,emblematic of his regime, as a hollow shell; Yu Fan's Sacrifice of Liu Hulan presents the well-recognized communist martyr of the revolution, not standing defiantly in her Mao suit, as she was regularly depicted in heroic sculptures and propoganda posters, but rather as a young girl brutally cut down, with the dignity of an individual rather than as the prototypical martyr.

Dialogue with Tradition
During the Mao era, social-realist painting took the public place that had traditionally belonged to calligraphy, after Mao condemned the classic Chinese arts as symbols of the elitism of conservative China. In the years since Mao's death, many Chinese artists have reestablished a dialogue with this traditional art form, whether through the creation of pseudo-calligraphic works or by using untraditional tools and surfaces. For example, Xu Bing’s installation The Living Word consists of over 400 Chinese characters hovering in space – characters from different Chinese periods for the word bird – showing how Chinese writing has developed from simple representations into more and more abstract signs. In Zhang Huan’s Family Tree, the artist directs three calligraphers to write texts chosen by him on his face until the meaning of the calligraphy is lost through repeated overwriting, just as the features of Zhang’s face disappeared.

Chinese art was once closely associated with landscape, until this tradition was suppressed during the Revolution, and contemporary artists now relate to this tradition in a variety of ways. Rendered on the surface of artist Huang Yan's body, Chinese Landscape – Tattoo reasserts the life force, or qi, that was always present in the landscape in traditional Chinese painting, and signals how China's cultural legacy has left a deep mark on its people. Liu Wei's manipulative photomontage Landscapes No. 1-6 refers to the ongoing presence of tradition while engaging in a humorous dialogue with China's strong taboo against depicting the naked body.

Toward a New China
The extensive reforms underway in China today, and the relentless speed with which they are implemented, are central to the work of many artists. Old China is being torn down almost overnight, while the country transforms itself into a global economic power, and traces of the past are rapidly disappearing. In one example, Ai Weiwei's Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn takes an historical work of art and destroys its nominal value, as the urn falls and breaks, while creating a contemporary conceptual artwork. Shao Yinong and Mu Chen's Assembly Hall series is an attempt at preserving a disappearing fragment of the past, illustrating the halls that were once used for local political meetings and that now serve very different purposes or stand quietly in decay.

With the disappearance of a state-mandated collective identity, contemporary Chinese artists address issues of individuality and new identity. In his Exchange Series, Cang Xin raises fundamental questions inherent in the attempts of young people in China to forge an identity for themselves that is strikingly different from that of their parents. By changing clothes with people in various occupations, the artist questions the role of external appearances in defining one's identity.

Made in China has been organized by the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark, and curated in Jerusalem by Suzanne Landau, the Israel Museum's Yulla and Jacques Lipchitz Chief Curator of the Arts and Landeau Foundation Curator of Contemporary Art. It is accompanied by a one hundred-page, full-color catalogue in English, along with a Hebrew insert. The exhibition is made possible by the Sam Weisbord Trust, Los Angeles. A wide away of public programs and events will be held at the Museum in concert with the exhibition.

To the exhibition site >> 

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The New Face of Ticho House: The Israel Museum Invites Young Curators to Join the Dialogue

A Room of Her Own opens a new season at Ticho House with women's portraits by Picasso, Modigliani and Matisse, on view December 4, 2007 – February 20, 2008.

Jerusalem, November 14, 2007 –  Even as the Israel Museum is renewing its exhibition space on its main campus, the Anna Ticho House, a satellite campus of the Museum, is moving toward center stage with a fresh, exciting program of exhibitions curated by young female curators from the Israel Musem's Bezalel Art Wing. Rising to the challenge of creating exhibitions in dialogue with and inspired by Anna Ticho and Ticho House, the curators use a variety of mediums, including painting, photography, video and animation, in exploring issues of living spaces and women in art. The first exhibition of the series, A Room of Her Own: Portraits of Women from the Israel Museum Collection, curated by Tania Sirakovich, begins this dialogue by addressing the subject of women in portraiture, from the nineteenth century to today, and brings to the Ticho House, for the first time, works of master artists Alexei von Jawlensky, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Pablo Picasso, Pierre Auguste Renior, Chaim Soutine and Andy Warhol, among others. 

In A Room of Her Own, it is modern woman, distanced from the traditional mythological or religious contexts of art history, who occupies the spotlight. The Israel Museum’s rich holdings in modern and contemporary art contain exquisite examples of painting, photography, drawing, and sculpture that underscore the diversity of woman’s image from the late nineteenth century on. A major inspiration for the exhibition is its setting: Ticho House in the center of Jerusalem, where Anna Ticho lived for many years, creating her highly personal, expressive paintings and welcoming the city’s artists and intellectuals. This exhibition focusing on women thus relates organically to both the artistic history and the domestic ambience of Anna Ticho’s own rooms. Women are seen in vibrant portraits and in the serene poses of everyday life, in a broad range of perceptions that testify to the changes their image has undergone for more than a century.

The exhibition presents paintings, sculptures and drawings by the most celebrated artists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as well as contemporary works by artists such as Cindy Sherman and Paloma Varga Weisz. A Room of Her Own marks the first exhibition in Israel of Pablo Picasso's The Seamstress (1906) and Chaim Soutine's Young Girl in Red (1928).

Ticho House
Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. 


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The Israel Museum, in Cooperation with the Company for Location and Restitution of Holocaust Victims’ Assets Launches Special Website for Works Stolen during World War II

Jerusalem, August 20, 2007 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, has completed an online catalogue of works of art and Judaica that were looted during the Second World War and given to the Museum for custodianship after the war.

Following the end of World War II, the Jewish Restitution Successor Organization (JRSO), charged with reclaiming stolen Jewish property, transferred many works of art and Judaica to Jewish institutions in Israel and worldwide. These objects either had no record of prior ownership history or came from institutions which did not survive the war. As part of this initiative, the Bezalel National Museum, the Israel Museum's predecessor, received several hundred works for custody. These works were moved to the Israel Museum in 1965, when the Museum was founded.

Details on all works are now available online, in an initiative coordinated with the Company for Location and Restitution of Holocaust Victims' Assets, in order to make information readily available to survivors and possible heirs and to assist in their efforts to reclaim objects formerly in their families' possession.

The website, entitled World War II Provenance Research Online, is part of the Israel Museum's website, www.imj.org.il, and includes a link to website of the Company for Location and Restitution of Holocaust Victims' Assets. It is accesible worldwide and provides information in the categories of paintings, works on paper and objects of Judaica. Information includes images of all objects, titles of works or other descriptive information, names of artists (if known), countries of origin (if known), dimensions and other identifying characteristics.

Requests for restitution should be submitted to the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, following instructions provided on the website.

Israel Museum - World War II Provenance Research Online

The website for the Company for Location and Restitution of Holocaust Victims' Assets is www.hashava.org.il.

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New Exhibition at Ticho House: Hidden Cities by Yemima Ergas

Opening: July 17, 2007
Exhibition curator: Timna Seligman

Hidden Cities (2006-2007) is a new series of drawings by veteran Israeli artist Yemima Ergas. In these works, cities rise out of charcoal strokes and smudges, creating familiar-looking, yet unidentifiable places: a building, a street, a bridge, a stadium. These hidden, anonymous cities contain structures that are repeated again and again in the various drawings, sometimes in the foreground and sometimes fading into the distance.

The combination of elements in Ergas' drawings creates images of cities that are futuristic and somewhat utopian. The grid-like plan and neo-classical style of the public buildings recall the perception of the future at the beginning of the 20th century, exemplified in the fascist architecture of Germany and Italy. However, by changing the way we look at the images, a longer examination reveals that Ergas has not actually drawn pictures of imagined cities but rather computer motherboards. Once the illusion is broken, the so-called cities lose their mystery. Their hyper-organization, perceived isolation, repetitive elements and protrusions that did not seem to fit when the mind was telling the eye to see an urban center make perfect sense when it realizes it is actually confronted with the internal workings of a computer. The computer motherboards add another layer of meaning, showing how the grand cities of the future as seen 100 years ago are today reduced to the inner workings of a tool that defines the reality of that "future."

Yemima Ergas
Yemima Ergas, born in Jerusalem, studied ceramics at the Bezalel Academy of Art and art at New York's Pratt Institute. Since 1979, she has been painting in her private studio in Jerusalem and teaching art and painting in various institutions. Ergas' works have been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions, and in a wide variety of projects and artistic collaborations. Since 1999, Ergas has been serving as a board member of the Painters and Sculptors Association in Jerusalem, and as the chairperson of the Jerusalem Artists’ House's exhibition committee. She has been active at the Agrippas 12 Cooperative Gallery since 2004. Ergas' works have been published in various books and other publications in Israel, and can be found in public and private collections worldwide.

The Ticho House
The Ticho House was bequeathed by Jerusalem's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980) to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. It houses a permanent collection of paintings by Anna Ticho, her husband Dr. Abraham Ticho's collection of Hanukah lamps, a reference library, temporary exhibitions, the Little Jerusalem restaurant and an extensive garden used for cultural and special events. The Ticho House is managed by the Israel Museum.

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Israel Museum Breaks Ground on Comprehensive Campus Project to Transform Facilities, Increase Gallery Space and Enhance Overall Visitor Experience

Museum Plans Active Schedule of Exhibitions and Programs throughout Project Period
Jerusalem, June 24, 2007 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, has launched a comprehensive $80-million project to renew, transform and unify the facilities on its landmark campus, with the goal of increasing accessibility to the Museum's collections and enhancing the overall visitor experience. The Museum will continue operations throughout the construction period with a full schedule of exhibitions, public events and educational programs to be held in its Weisbord Exhibition Pavilion, Shrine of the Book and Model of Second Temple Period Jerusalem Complex, Billy Rose Art Garden and Ruth Youth Wing.

"The founding of the Israel Museum was one of the most important events following the founding of the State of Israel," remarked Israel's President-Elect Shimon Peres at the Museum's International Council, which convened earlier this month. "Its renewal is central to the destiny of Israel. If politics is part of everyday life, the Israel Museum is part of life's inspiration."

The design of the campus project is a joint initiative of James Carpenter Design Associates, New York, and Efrat-Kowalsky Architects, Tel Aviv, with additional support by A.Lerman Architects Ltd, Tel Aviv. The project is the most comprehensive initiative undertaken since the Museum opened in 1965, and was inspired first and foremost by the desire to enhance visitor services and facilities on a campus which has grown ten-fold over the past four decades.

The multi-year program will create new entrance facilities, an enclosed route of passage from the front of the campus to a relocated main entrance hall with access to all of the Museum’s curatorial collection wings, reorganized and expanded collection galleries, and newly centralized temporary exhibition space. Overall 80,000 square feet of new construction will be added and 200,000 square feet of gallery space will be re-ordered, renewed and expanded, largely within the Museum's existing 500,000-square-foot architectural envelope. The Museum is also concurrently working with Pentagram Partners, London, to renew the Bronfman Archaeology Wing, planned to provide a narrative timeline of the archaeological history of the ancient Land of Israel.

The Museum anticipates celebrating the staged completion of the project and complete reinstallation of its collection galleries in time for its 45th anniversary in May, 2010.

"We are entering an exciting period during which the Museum will continue to operate in fresh and innovative ways for our public even as our campus undergoes a process of transformational renewal, which will define the course for its future vitality," said James S. Snyder, the Museum's Anne and Jerome Fisher director. "We are grateful to the many friends from around the world whose commitment and support are making this program possible, and to our local constituency whose dedication to the Museum and impressive engagement with our campus and ongoing program of exhibitions and activities are the impetus for this major undertaking."

Project Funding
The Museum's overall program for renewal of its campus comprises $80 million in budgetary scope, of which over $60 million comes from private support. Of this total, $50 million was contributed by 16 families and family foundations internationally and in Israel, whose support will be acknowledged collectively for the renewal of the Museum's campus. This is an important and unparalleled precedent for collective philanthropy in Israel.

The international donors to this fund include: Judy and Michael Steinhardt, New York; the Estate of Dorothea Gould, Zurich; Herta and Paul Amir, Los Angeles; the Nash Family Foundation, New York; the Marc Rich Foundation, Lucerne; the Bella and Harry Wexner Philanthropies of The Legacy Heritage Fund, New York and Jerusalem; and Linda and Harry Macklowe, New York. Donors in Israel, whose contributions matched challenge grants from the Schusterman Foundation – Israel and Yad Hanadiv, the Rothschild Foundation in Israel, include: the Federmann Family, Tel Aviv; Debbie and Erel Margalit, Jerusalem; Dina, Michael, and Oudi Recanati, Tel Aviv; Rivka Saker and Uzi Zucker, New York and Tel Aviv; and Judith and Israel Yovel, Herzliya.

The renewal of the Bronfman Archaeology Wing, built originally through the generosity of the children of Samuel Bronfman on the occasions of his 80th birthday, is being supported by Charles Bronfman and his family, in memory of Saidye and Samuel Bronfman, with additional support from the Wolfson Charitable Trust, London.

Remaining funding to complete the project's overall budgetary scope includes matching support from the Government of the State of Israel.

Exhibition and Program Highlights
The Museum is committed to sustaining an active schedule of exhibitions and public programs throughout the duration of the campus renewal project, both on site and at its offsite locations at the Rockefeller Museum and the Ticho House in Jerusalem. Ongoing and upcoming exhibition highlights include:
Surrealism and Beyond, on view through August 15, 2007, in the Weisbord Exhibition Pavilion. This exhibition showcases 215 works from the Museum's internationally recognized holdings in Surrealist art, its precursors and its successor movements, featuring paintings, sculptures, photographs, prints, and drawings by such artists as Salvador Dalí, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, René Magritte, Joan Miró and Man Ray.

The Shrine of the Book and Model of Second Temple Period Jerusalem Complex presents an extremely rare 7th-8th century CE Hebrew biblical manuscript on display for the first time anywhere. A fragment of the Book of Exodus, the "Song of the Sea" manuscript comes from the "silent era," a period from which very few Hebrew biblical manuscripts survive and which therefore serves as a historical bridge between the latest Dead Sea Scroll from the 2nd century and the 10th century Aleppo Codex, both of which are housed in the Shrine of the Book.

Also new to the Shrine complex is the Dorot Foundation Dead Sea Scrolls Information and Study Center, offering technologically-based information services for general public and scholars alike. The Center includes a general-audience film that illuminates the rich historical period of the Second Temple just before its destruction, as well as the existence of the Qumran community in the Judean Desert where the Dead Sea Scrolls were inscribed.
At the Museum's Ticho House in downtown Jerusalem, a new exhibition by artist Yemima Ergas, Hidden Cities, will open on July 17. This new series of drawings depicts fantastical cityscapes reminiscent of the majestic Modernism of the early twentieth century.

The Rockefeller Museum in East Jerusalem, which operates under the aegis of the Israel Museum, presents a new exhibition, Beliefs and Believers: Ancient Art from the Israel Museum. The exhibition showcases, in the Rockefeller Museum's own unique setting, thirty-four singular treasures from the Israel Museum's Archaeology Wing, focusing on objects of ritual and religion.

The Museum's ongoing program of public activities regularly includes a wide range of concerts, films, symposia, gallery talks, special events, and school programs. The beginning of on-site work on the campus renewal project coincides with the kick-off of the Museum's Summer of Renewal program of activities and events, including:

A full range of family activities and workshops in the Ruth Youth Wing relating to the exhibition Water in Art and Life, starting June 16
The Youth Wing Summer Camp, for children who love art, starting July 1
Performances by the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra, the Aluminum Show (dance theater), and the Philharmonia Singers, July 10, August 7 and August 21 respectively
The Museum's annual Israeli Wine-Tasting Festival, a celebration of wine tasting from Israel’s leading vineyards, July 31– August 2
The Museum's 22nd Kite-Flying Festival, a colorful annual tradition of kite-flying and kite-making workshops, August 14
The Billy Rose Art Garden remains open to the public and is set to host a variety of public events, beginning with the Museum's Summer of Renewal events.

The Museum also continues its traveling exhibition programs, through which it shares its collections and curatorial initiatives with audiences worldwide. Currently on tour in the United States, the exhibition Cradle of Christianity: Jewish and Christian Treasures from the Holy Land is on view at the Michael C. Carlos Museum in Atlanta through October 14, 2007.


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Beliefs and Believers: Ancient Art from the Israel Museum
At the Rockefeller Museum

New Exhibition Highlights the Best of the Israel Museum's Archaeological Holdings

Jerusalem, June 12, 2007 – The Rockefeller Museum, named for American philanthropist John D. Rockefeller Jr. is one of the Jerusalem's most exquisite gems. Off the beaten path, the nearly 70 year-old museum is housed in an ornately designed building from the period of the British Mandate. Architect Austen St. Barbe Harrison designed the building, located adjacent to the northeastern corner of the Old City, to seamlessly integrate architectural elements from East and West.

This week, the Rockefeller Museum opens a new exhibition, Beliefs and Believers: Ancient Art from the Israel Museum, which showcases, in its own unique setting, 34 of the most striking and significant objects from the permanent archaeology galleries of the Israel Museum. Common to all of the objects, which span from the Prehistoric to the Islamic period, is the focus on ritual and religion. In contrast to modern art, ancient art was not a form of personal expression; it did not reflect the worldview of the individual, but rather that of the community. As such, it mainly served religion, mediating between the believer and his god/s. Thus the objects displayed in the exhibition are a primary source for understanding the beliefs of the inhabitants of the Land of Israel over the centuries.

The depictions of humans in ancient times resemble those of the gods, their creators. Thus, for the modern viewer, it is not always easy to distinguish between human and divine. The objects in the Beliefs and Believers exhibition include statues of life-like figures that represent both gods and immortals, such as the image of the storm god standing on a bull from the 13th century BCE, vessel-shaped images representing worshipers from the Iron Age (First Temple Period), and magnificent stone statues of the Greek and Roman gods. In order to shed light on ritual form in ancient times, the exhibition includes a variety of ceremonial objects including a 9,000 year-old Neolithic mask used as a part of rites for the deceased, clay musicians participating in a religious ceremony from the Iron Age, an altar depicting the Roman wine god Dionysus, and Byzantine 'magical' plaques that were used to ward off demons and evil spirits from the home.

Exhibition curators: Fawzi Ibrahim and Dr. Tallay Ornan

Rockefeller Museum
27 Sultan Suleiman St.; Tel. (02) 628-3354
Hours: Sun., Mon., Wed. and Thurs. 10 am – 3 pm; Sat. 10 am – 2 pm
To arrange guided tours for groups please call: (02) 670-8884
FREE ENTRANCE IN JUNE

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Water in Art and Life
in the Ruth Youth Wing at the Israel Museum

New Exhibition Presents the Many Faces of Water in Works by Israeli and International Artists

Jerusalem – June 17, 2007 –The Ruth Youth Wing in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, is focusing this summer on water, its role in our lives, and its representation in works of art from ancient times until today. The Water in Art and Life exhibition brings together works of painting, sculpture, photography and video art, as well as interactive installations, multimedia educational information and a variety of hands-on activities. Through the eyes of artists from Israel and abroad, water is used as a tool for a wide variety of expression and commentary on personal, social and environmental issues.

"There is no life without water," says exhibition curator Hagit Allon. "Water is the source of all living things and yet, in the history of art, it has been so infrequently a subject of exploration in itself. It is fascinating how, over the years, the use of water in art has transformed from being predominantly scenic to being a subject on its own."

Japanese artist Mariko Mori's photographic work Empty Dream (1995), covering an entire wall at the entrance to the exhibition, is a man-made beach that plays with the boundary between real and artificial, in which the artist herself appears four times as a mermaid. Other playful works include Gennady Berinsky's The Little Mermaid (2007), an interactive environment in which a siren-like mermaid beckons the visitor toward a torrential waterfall, and Shira Zelwer's Tub (2006, wax and acrylic), in which a gleeful child enjoys her bath. Other artists explore subjects such as pools, waterfalls, fish, the sea and the movement of water: Eden Ofrat's The Pool (2005) is a video of the daily progress of a pool's reflection, projected on plexiglass and surrounded by dry leaves; Céleste Boursier-Mougenot's untitled work (1999–2002) uses a water pump to propel assorted bowls around at inflatable plastic pool; and Shelly Federman's video Underwater (2004) uses an underwater camera to film the dance of a group of smiling synchronized swimmers.

One section of the exhibition deals with the subject of water in Israel. Young Israeli artists have become increasingly disturbed by Israel's chronic water shortages, as well as by water pollution, and this concern is a central theme in their work. Some of the artists use their works as criticism of the way the country and its people are dealing with the issue, painting a disturbing picture, while others convey a kind of nostalgia for the way things used to be before the current emergency situation. Alongside the works, educational information explains the problems and suggests ways in which the public can help solve them.

The exhibition ends with an artistic homage to water as a purifying and sanctifying element, as seen by many different cultures, from the ancient world until today. Various artifacts and photographs document religious traditions and ceremonies that have developed around water. A 13th century Iranian fountain and Said Nuseibeh's photograph of the courtyard pool at the Queen Arwa Mosque in Yemen (1994), used for washing the feet before entering the mosque, are examples of the role water plays in the Islamic tradition; a certificate of baptism in the Jordan River (2007) and Dan Arnon's photograph of the Syrian Orthodox Church's Holy Thursday foot-washing ceremony depict water's significance in the various Christian traditions; and an illustration of a woman bathing in a 'mikvah' (Jewish ritual bath) in a 1739 Viennese book of blessings illuminates Jewish religious practices. Works exploring other cultures include Yossi Zeliger's photograph Immersion in the Ganges (1994, India) and the bronze Aphrodite rising from the sea from around 200 BCE.

Summer in the Youth Wing: The Joy of Water

During the summer months, the Youth Wing courtyard will be transformed into a "lakeside," around which the whole family can enjoy getting wet. Children and adults alike are invited to construct boats and water toys, paint with watercolors, prepare food and drinks made with water and participate in competitions. At the entrance to the Youth Wing, the yard will be adorned with water sculptures, both comical and interactive, a lily pond, a giant sandbox for fun on the "beach," and appearances by guest artists and musicians. The Recycling Room will host a special water-related workshop throughout the summer as well. Extra charge applies for workshops and performances.

Special Summer Hours
July: Tuesday 4- 7 pm; Friday 10 am- 1 pm
August: Sunday - Thursday 10 am - 2 pm; Tuesday also 4 -7 pm; Friday 10 am - 1 pm

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The Israel Museum Acquires Contemporary Works by International Artists
Works by Mark Dion and Others Enhance the Museum's Contemporary Art Collection

Jerusalem – May 20, 2007 – The Israel Museum announced today the acquisition of six works of contemporary art by Mark Dion, Ceal Floyer, Tim Gardner, Anne Hardy, Raymond Pettibon, and Na'ama Tsabar. The acquisition of these works was made possible with support from the Contemporary Art Acquisition Committees of the American Friends of the Israel Museum in New York, on the recommendation of Suzanne Landau, the Museum's Yulla and Jacques Lipchitz Chief Curator of the Arts and Landeau Foundation Curator of Contemporary Art.

"Thanks to the ongoing support of our Friends organizations worldwide, the Israel Museum maintains an active program of contemporary acquisitions, a remarkable feat for a museum of such encyclopaedic breadth as ours," said James S. Snyder, the Museum's Anne and Jerome Fisher Director. "These new acquisitions underscore the focus of the Museum's agenda in contemporary art, which is committed to collecting signature works by established and emerging artists, in order to build a holding of singular examples of the work of the most significant artists of our time."

The announcement of these acquisitions coincides with the creation of the Museum's first endowment fund for the acquisition of contemporary art. The Barbara and Eugene Schwartz Contemporary Art Acquisition Endowment Fund will allow the Museum, for the first time, to bolster its acquisition activity with assured endowment support, paralleling the ongoing efforts of its Friends' contemporary art committees in New York, Los Angeles, London, Paris, and Tel Aviv.

The newly acquired works include:

Mark Dion, Antiquarian Book Shop , 200 6: In this newly-conceived, site-specific work for the Museum's Billy Rose Art Garden, American artist Mark Dion re-creates the categorization and exhibition practices of museums and explores the intersection between art collecting and display with nature and archaeol ogy. Another of Dion's works, Packages, 2006-2007, is currently on view in the Museum's Surrealism and Beyond exhibition
.

Mark Dion

Mark Dion

Mark Dion, American, born 1961 New Bedford , Massachusetts
Lives and works in Beach Lake , PA
The Antiquarian’s Bookshop, 2006 –
Site-specific installation for the Billy Rose Art Garden
Mixed media
Gallery: Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York

Raymond Pettibon , Sunday Night and Saturday Morning , 200 5: This DVD animation by American artist Raymond Pettibon is based on his well-known drawings, which pull freely from a range of sources including music, politics, literature, art history, sports, movies, and comic books. His sophisticated combination of image and text critically questions popular myths.

pETTIBON

Raymond Pettibon American, born 1957 Tucson, Arizona
Lives and works in California.
Sunday Night and Saturday Morning, 2005
DVD animation, 16:45 minutes
Edition 3/5
Gallery: Regen Projects gallery, Los Angeles

Ceal Floyer, Double Act, 200 6 : This light installation by Pakistan-born, British artist Ceal Floyer suggests a stage set for performance, whereby the artist uses a spotlight to project the image of a red theatre curtain onto the gallery wall. Her witty use of illusion and double-takes gently subverts our usual viewing habits, raising questions about the relationship between reality and representation, illusion and imitation.

Ceal Floyer

Ceal Floyer, British, born 1968 Karachi, Pakistan
Lives and works in Berlin
Double Act, 2006
Edition 3/3
Light projection
Gallery: Lisson Gallery, London

Tim Gardner, Figure Watching the Moon , 2006: This watercolor painting by Canadian artist Tim Gardner depicts a moonlit seascape with a solitary figure, lost in an expanse of sea and sky. Inspired by Romantic masters and based on photographed images, this remarkable work addresses such themes as the balance between the sublime and the banal in a contemporary context.

Tim Gardener

Tim Gardner, Canadian, born 1973 Iowa City, US
Lives and works in Canada
Figure Watching the Moon, 2006
Watercolor on paper (framed)
65 x 80 x 4 cm (25.75 x 31.5 x 1.5 in.)
image size 44 x 61cm
Gallery: Stuart Shave/Modern Art, Lond

Anne Hardy, Untitled IV (balloons) , 2005: This photograph by British photographer Anne Hardy seems at first glance to show an abandoned space following a party. On closer look, however, the photograph reveals itself to be a meticulously st aged and disconcerting 'interior landscape' that the artist built in her studio with found objects .

Anne Hardy

Anne Hardy, British, born 1970
Lives and works in London.
Untitled IV (balloons), 2005
Diasec mounted c-type print
120 cm x 150 cm
Gallery: Maureen Paley Gallery, London

Na'ama Tsabar, Encore , 2006: This installation by Israeli artist Na'ama Tzabar comprises a rock stage suspended in space, covered with musical instruments, microphones and speakers, all completely masked with black gaffer tape to create the illusion of a blackened field of ghosts. This work was recently shown at Tel Aviv's Dvir Gallery and will be exhibited at Art Basel this June. *

Naama Tsabar

Naama Tsabar, Israeli, born 1982
Encore, 2006
Installation, Mixed media
Papier-mâché, iron frame, black gaffer tape
170 x 450 x 380 cm
Gallery: Dvir Gallery, Tel-Aviv

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Rare Scroll Fragment in First-Time Public Display at the Israel Museum
One of Only a Few Surviving Hebrew Manuscripts from the 600-Year "Silent Era"

Jerusalem, May 27, 2007 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, announced today the unveiling of an extremely rare and never-before-exhibited Hebrew scroll fragment from what is known as the "silent era" – the six-hundred year period from the 3rd through 8th centuries CE from which almost no Hebrew manuscripts have survived. The fragment, dating from the 7th or 8th century, is believed to have been part of the Cairo Genizah, a vast depository of medieval Jewish manuscripts discovered in Cairo's Ben Ezra Synagogue in the late 19th century.

The manuscript is a fragment of a Torah scroll from the book of Exodus (13:19-16:1), which includes the Song of the Sea, widely recognized as one of the most beautiful examples of biblical poetry. The Song celebrates the Israelites' safe crossing of the Red Sea, praises the Almighty for vanquishing their enemies, and anticipates their arrival in the Promised Land.

"The Song of the Sea manuscript is one-of-a-kind in terms of its historical and literary significance," said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. "It bridges the gap in the period of history between the Dead Sea Scrolls [1st-2nd century CE] and the Aleppo Codex [10th century], both of which are permanently housed in the Shrine of the Book. The opportunity to display this manuscript fragment alongside the Museum's own remarkable holdings of ancient biblical texts provides a unique example of textual continuity that can only be seen here, in our Museum's Shrine of the Book, in Jerusalem."

On May 22, on the eve of the Jewish holiday of Shavuot, celebrating the anniversary of the giving of the Torah to the Israelites at Mount Sinai, the Song of the Sea manuscript began its first public display in the Shrine of the Book. It remains at the Israel Museum on extended loan

from Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, with gratitude to Dr. Fuad and Mrs. Terry Ashkar, Miami, Florida and Prof. James H. Charlesworth, Princeton Theological Seminary, New Jersey.

The "Silent Era" of Hebrew Manuscripts

The Song of the Sea manuscript provides a rare historical bridge. Written centuries after the last Dead Sea Scrolls (approximately 2nd century CE), the manuscript includes some examples of delicate lettering that resemble the Scrolls, while other letters recall examples from rare 6th century manuscripts. However, the text is also strikingly similar to the Masoretic (traditional) version familiar from such later Biblical codices as the 11th century Leningrad Codex in the Russian National Library in St. Petersburg. Many stylistic elements of the Song fragment link it to manuscripts originating in Egypt, including those found in the Cairo Genizah.

"The Song of the Sea manuscript demonstrates the tremendous fidelity with which the Masoretic version of the Bible was transmitted over the centuries," said Dr. Adolfo Roitman, head of the Shrine of the Book and curator of the Dead Sea Scrolls. "It is incredible how the distinctive prosody of the Song of Sea is the same today as it was in the 7th-8th centuries."

There are several conjectures as to why very few manuscripts in Hebrew survive from the period of the 3rd – 8th centuries CE, the most prevalent of these being the continuing persecution of the Jews and the related destruction of Jewish manuscripts. Biblical manuscripts do exist from this period in Greek, Latin and other languages, but it is only from the 9th century onward that Hebrew manuscripts have been found in greater abundance.

From Obscurity to the Shrine of the Book

Until the late 1970s, the Song of the Sea manuscript was part of the Hebrew manuscript collection of Lebanese-born American physician Fuad Ashkar. Dr. Ashkar was not aware of the historical significance of the Song manuscript until he contacted Professor James Charlesworth at Duke University, now the George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature at Princeton Theological Seminary. Carbon analysis proved that the manuscript dated from "the silent era" of Hebrew biblical manuscripts and was therefore one of a few of its kind ever to have surfaced worldwide. The fragment was subsequently housed in the Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Special Collections Library at Duke University.

In 2004, Prof. Charlesworth brought the manuscript to the attention of Dr. Adolfo Roitman, and it is now on extended loan to the Museum. Since its arrival in Jerusalem, the manuscript has undergone extensive conservation treatment, undertaken by Michael Maggen, head of the Israel Museum's Paper Conservation Laboratory, in consultation with Duke University.  
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Israel Museum Presentation Marks First Public Display of the “Heliodorus Stele”
Recently Deciphered Greek Inscription from Israel Suggests New Perspectives on Second Maccabees

Jerusalem, May 3, 2007 - The Israel Museum unveiled today a unique 2,200-year-old stele (inscribed stone block) that provides new insight into the dramatic story of Heliodorus and the Temple in Jerusalem, as related in the Second Book of Maccabees.

“The Heliodorus stele is one of the most important and revealing Hellenistic inscriptions from Israel,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “It contextualizes the Second Book of Maccabees and provides an independent and authentic source for an important episode in the history leading up to the Maccabean Revolt, whose victorious conclusion is celebrated each year during the Jewish festival of Hanukkah.”

The newly deciphered stele presents new information about Heliodorus, who, according to the Second Book of Maccabees, received orders to seize the treasure in the Temple in Jerusalem, but was driven from the sanctuary by the miraculous appearance of a fearsome horseman accompanied by two mighty youths.

This presentation marks the first public display of the Heliodorus stele, which is on extended loan to the Museum from Michael and Judy Steinhardt of New York. The stele documents a correspondence in ancient Greek between Heliodorus and King Seleucus IV, ruler of the Seleucid Empire from 187 to 175 BCE, who was succeeded by Antiochus IV Epiphanes (best known from the story of Hanukkah). In his letter, King Seleucus announces the appointment of an administrator to oversee the sanctuaries within the province that included the Land of Israel.

The appointment of an overseer of the sanctuaries - including the Temple in Jerusalem - was intended to bring the province into line with the rest of the Seleucid Empire. This position included authority over the sanctuaries’ revenues and, above all, taxes due to the king. It is likely, however, that the Jews regarded this appointment as an infringement of Jewish religious autonomy.

This episode may have foreshadowed events yet to come. Less than ten years later (169/8 BCE), a new Seleucid king, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, and his armies would enter Jerusalem, massacre its inhabitants, rob the Temple treasury, and desecrate the Holy of Holies. Thus the new appointment, recorded on the stele, appears to mark the beginning of Greek/Seleucid interference in Jewish religious affairs, which eventually led to the outbreak of the Maccabean revolt in 167 BCE.

The Heliodorus stele is part of a special display, curated by David Mevorah, Curator of Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine Archaeology, entitled “Royal Correspondence on Stone - The Overseer of the Sanctuaries.” On view through June 2007, this presentation also includes another Hellenistic stele from the royal administration of the Seleucid Empire - the Hefzibah stele - part of the Museum’s permanent archaeological holdings.

The writings on the Heliodorus stele have been deciphered and interpreted by Professor Hannah Cotton-Paltiel of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Professor Michael Woerrle of the Commission for Ancient History and Epigraphy at the German Archaeological Institute in Munich. Analysis of the stone’s patina by Professor Yuvel Goren of Tel Aviv University suggests that the stele most likely came from the lowlands between the Judaean hills and the Mediterranean coast.

New Research on Historical Significance of the Heliodorus Stele

The Heliodorus stele preserves three missives from the royal administration of King Seleucus IV (187-175 BCE). The earliest and most significant of the three letters is from King Seleucus IV to Heliodorus, of which only the preamble remains. In it, the King announces the appointment of an administrator to oversee the sanctuaries within the Seleucid province of Koile-Syria and Phoinike, including the Land of Israel. The other two, dating from the late summer 178 BCE, are shorter notes transmitting the directives of the King from Heliodorus to his subordinates.

By this appointment, the King intended to bring the province of Koile-Syria and Phoinike into line with the other regions in the empire. The appointment of a new overseer would help ensure royal control over the sanctuaries and their revenues. The opportunity for this new appointment was necessitated by the death or dismissal of a former governor, who had also served as chief priest in the province and presumably controlled the revenues of its sanctuaries. Correspondence between the previous governor and Antiochus III, the father of King Seleucus IV, is preserved on the Hefzibah stele, also included in the current installation, which went on display in the Israel Museum following its discovery in northern Israel in the 1960s.

The complete findings of Cotton-Paltiel, Woerrle, and Goren have recently been published in Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, the leading international journal for the publication of documents from classical antiquity.

Translation of Greek Text on the Heliodorus Stele
by Hannah Cotton-Paltiel and Michael Woerrle

Dorymenes to Diophanes greetings:

The copy of the letter given us by Heliodorus who is in charge of the affairs is enclosed. You will do well therefore if you take care that everything is carried out according to the instructions.
Year 134, 22 of the month of Gorpiaius (August 178 BCE)

Heliodorus to Dorymenes his brother greetings:

The copy of the order given us by the king concerning Olympiodorus is placed below. You will do well therefore if you follow the instructions.
Year 134, 20(?) of the month of Gorpiaius (August 178 BCE)

King Seleucus to Heliodorus his brother greetings:

Taking the utmost consideration for the safety of our subjects, and thinking it to be of the greatest good for the affairs in our realm when those living in our kingdom manage their lives without fear, and at the same time realizing that nothing can enjoy a fitting prosperity without the good will of the gods, we have given orders from the outset that the sanctuaries founded in the other satrapies receive the traditional honors with the care befitting them. But since the affairs in Koile-Syria and Phoinike stand in need of the appointment of someone to take care of these (i.e. sanctuaries) … Olympiodorus ... .

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The Israel Museum Presents its First Solo Exhibition of
Young Israeli Artist Michal Helfman
Just Be Good to Me: Opening April 26th

Tel Aviv-native Michal Helfman (b. 1973) has become, since her graduation from the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in 1998, a well-known name on the local art scene. Winner of the prestigious Wolf Foundation Anselm Kiefer Prize in 1998 and the Young Artist Prize in 2001, Helfman’s installations have been seen in numerous solo and group exhibitions in Israel and abroad. Traditionally, her work has been associated with nightlife. Formerly the designer for the club Haoman 17, many of her earlier works explored the nightclub scene in all of its glitter and youth, darkness and emptiness. Just Be Good to Me shows a significant change of tone. While retaining her earlier trademark focus on light and darkness, in her new installation, Helfman uses motherhood, representations of womanhood and the transition from childhood to adulthood to examine the boundaries between interior and exterior, conscious and unconscious, orderly life and destructive passion.

Just Be Good to Me integrates video, sculpture, installation and drawing. The opening scene of the film, which is screened in the first room of the exhibition, shows Helfman herself diapering her son. The atmosphere is one of cozy domestic intimacy. However as the camera retreats we see that what we thought was a house is only a stage set in the middle of the desert. Playing in the background is the pop song Just Be Good to Me, which, without its rhythmic accompaniment, sounds like a primal human entreaty. The artist picks up her son and heads for the mountains, recalling the departure of Hagar and Ishmael from Abraham’s camp and the beginning of their journey into the desert. Although at first glance the artist appears to be inviting the viewer to a rite of passage from an existence within regulated confines to a life of freedom, in actual fact this is a journey in which uncertainty and terror overcome security and innocence, and there are no moments of exaltation.

Among the devices the installation uses to express movement and the transition from one state to another are objects from the world of dance: a sculpture reminiscent of Degas’ famous Little Dancer of Fourteen Years, now grown up and sexually mature; a ballet dancers’ barre, twisted out of shape and no longer useable; and a nightclub dancer’s pole growing out of a hole in the ground with the dancer’s shoe placed beside it. The exhibition’s Hebrew name – Bat-Dor – is the same as that of the classical and modern dance troupe that enjoyed great success in the 1970s and was recently disbanded. The name contains a promise of modernity and a willingness to be mindful of the present, to be “a daughter of the generation” (bat ha-dor) and, indeed, the daughter of every generation. However, the troupe itself did not survive the test of time and the promise was not kept. This is also the case with the transition between the different sections of the installation, which is not linear but complex, offering no solutions and providing the visitor with a simultaneous experience of completion and disintegration. The continual apprearance of mirrors and mirror-like surfaces throughout the exhibition is a reminder to the viewer that s/he is part of the theme, in transition as well.

Exhibit Curator: Amitai Mendelsohn

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EDEN
THE LONGING FOR THE EAST IN THE 19TH CENTURY
NEW EXHIBITION AT THE ISRAEL MUSEUM
March, 28 – June 18, 2007

“Eden – East And West: Art In The 19th Century” is the title of an exhibition that will open at the Israel Museum on 28 March 2007.

The subject of one part of the exhibition is the Middle East and the Land of Israel in the 19th Century as a focus of yearning, longing, and curiosity, as well as of a patronizing look at the “different” and the “exotic.” The exhibition shows the artistic expression of these feelings in paintings, drawings, photographs, arts and crafts and ethnographic costumes. European painters and photographers visited biblical sites imbued with religious meaning, producing portrayals of the local landscape and population. These views of the East were suffused with holiness, but also with yearning for the exotic and the fantastic, the colorful and exciting. Eroticism can also be found, and as historians have said: “the motives of the Orient were like screens on which Europeans projected their fantasies like on a movie screen.” The exhibition examines the encounter between ideas, feelings, and forms stemming from various worldviews and faiths, and it juxtaposes works and objects from usually separate areas — European art next to Israeli and Islamic art, paintings, photos, prints, and drawings, Judaica and ethnography — mostly from the Museum’s collections. The depictions of holy places on Jewish ritual objects or European bibelots are shown along with Abel Pann’s paintings of seductive women; depictions of Jerusalem by artists Turner and Roberts next to early photographs of these same sites; works of Bezalel artists together with Maurizio Gottlieb’s painting of “Jesus in the Temple”; and many other such encounters.

The other part of the exhibition Eden is called “Out of North Africa: Photographs of Jewish Life from the Gerard Levy Collection in the Israel Museum” will also be shown within this framework. Gerard Levy, a photography expert and collector, donated to the Museum some years ago a rare and unique collection of more than 300 ethnographic photos documenting Jewish life in North Africa in the years 1880-1910. The Museum was fortunate to receive this special collection, which not only enriches its photography and ethnography collections, but also is an important tool for historical research. In addition to the photographs, this exhibition features splendid clothing, head coverings, and other accessories from Algeria, Morocco and Tunis from the collections of the Israeli Communities Department at the Museum. All of these items appear in the photographs of the Levy collection, and together they offer a rare glimpse of the glorious past and the rich material culture of the Jews of North Africa.

The artwork and objects in this group of interdisciplinary exhibitions were gathered from the Museum’s various collections and curated by an interdepartmental team of curators.

Naomi Felicitas Wonnenberg
Foreign press officer
The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
972.2.670.8935
[email protected]

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Landscape of Longing: Avraham Ofek's Early and Late Works
March 16, through June 18, 2007
Opening March 15, 6:30 pm Merzbacher Galleries

Avraham Ofek 's early paintings contained portrayals of landscape that were at once lyrical and rugged; later in his career, most depictions of the landscape appeared as undefined and receded into the background. Near the end of his life, however, the actual landscape of Jerusalem returned to assume an important role in Ofek's work, this time embodied in images that reflect the loss and despair that engulfed the artist. Many of Ofek's landscapes are laden with a sense of alienation and solitude, as well as nostalgia for the city of his birth, Sofia. The exhibition features some seventy paintings and drawings, and focuses on the artist's early landscapes of the 1950s and their relaitonship to those painted closer to the time of his death in 1990.

Naomi Felicitas Wonnenberg
Foreign press officer
The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
972.2.670.8935
[email protected]

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The Israel Museum Presents Major Exhibition Exploring Surrealism, Dada and Their Legacies in Contemporary Art
Surrealism and Beyond
On view February 27– June 30, 2007

Jerusalem, February 8, 2007 - The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, presents a comprehensive survey of Surrealism, from its roots in the beginnings of the Dada movement in 1916 through recent manifestations in international contemporary art. Drawn from more than 1,200 works in the Museum’s world-renowned holdings in these subjects, most notably the Vera and Arturo Schwarz Collection of Dada and Surrealist Art, Surrealism and Beyond includes 250 highlights by such artists as Dali, Duchamp, Magritte, and Man Ray, as well as a specially commissioned installation by American artist Mark Dion. The exhibition is on view from February 27 through June 30, 2007.

“The connection between Surrealism and the Israel Museum began as a ‘chance encounter,’ some forty years ago when the Museum was founded, and it has evolved into a deep and lasting relationship,” states James Snyder, Director of the Israel Museum.“ Thanks in great part to generous gifts from donors and artists alike, the Museum has formed an unusually comprehensive collection and library reflecting the Dada and Surrealist achievement.” The exhibition showcases the range of innovative mediums and artistic strategies used by these groundbreaking movements. Given the encyclopedic nature of the Museum’s holdings, the exhibition also provides some rich opportunities to display works from the Museum’s collections of non-Western cultures, especially examples of African and Oceanic art, illuminating some of the sources that served to inspiration them.

Organized thematically, Surrealism and Beyond offers a rich vision of this avant-garde heritage in painting, sculpture, assemblage, readymade, photomontage, and collage. All major practitioners are represented, among them Jean (Hans) Arp, Salvador Dali, Paul Delvaux, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Hanna Höch, René Magritte, Joan Miró, Man Ray, and Kurt Schwitters, along with contemporary artists influenced by them.

Automatism and Its Evolution focuses on the Surrealists’ exploration of the mind’s hidden realms. Writers and artists developed “automatic” techniques to free their works from the limitations of conscious thought. Arshile Gorky used automatic drawing to create mystery and ambiguity in his work The Beginning (1947). Man Ray, on the other hand, applied these techniques to photography. His 1921 photograph Rayograph (1921) was produced without using a camera; objects were placed directly on light sensitive paper and exposed to light. Man Ray used the same technique for the overnight production of his famous short film Le Retour à la raison (1923), also on view in the exhibition.

Desire reveals how artists and poets probed unconscious fantasies, fears, and inhibitions through their work, driving to liberate desire and libido through art as a form of rebellion against social and political censorship during their time. Using the female body as an object for the focus of unresolved conflicts and anxieties, many Surrealist artists examined the more sadistic sides of these phenomena.

This section includes Dali’s and Horst P. Horst’s photograph The Dream of Venus (1939), showing a woman wearing a black mask and an erotic costume. In her hands she holds two oysters, an eel curls around her waist, and a lobster covers her genitalia, referencing male Surrealist discourse on eroticism and shock. Mixing humor, sexuality, and provocation, Meret Oppenheim’s Squirrel (1960) assembles a foaming cup of beer with a furry tail.

Illusion and Dreamscape examines the Surrealist belief in the liberating potential of dreams and the imagination. Surrealist dreamscapes evoke mystery and challenge our perception of reality, juxtaposing disconnected objects, often within landscapes in which time and space are distorted. Among them, Magritte’s poetic inventions are seemingly simple images replete with complex associations and illusions. His 1959 painting The Castle of the Pyrenees unleashes mystery and a sense of imbalance as an enormous rock, with a castle atop, hovers above the sea in a clouded blue sky. Claude Cahun’s hand-colored photograph Le Coeur de pic (1936), shows dolls’ hands assembled into a sunflower.

Biomorphism and Metamorphosis reflects the Surrealist tendency to favor ambiguous and organic shapes and to look to anatomy, plants, bodies of water, and astronomy as inspiration. Two examples include Jean (Hans) Arp’s Fruit Torso (1960), which links plant life with the feminine form to focus on procreation as a metaphor for artistic creation, and Max Ernst’s bronze sculpture King Playing with the Queen (1944), which reveals the influences of Hopi Indian Kachina dolls and Western African cultures.

Marvelous Juxtapositions explores the use of found and readymade materials in collages, montages, and objects. Fragments of the everyday world are placed together unexpectedly to shock, seduce, and disorient the viewer. Duchamp’s Fountain (1917/1964), for instance, is credited with introducing Dada to American art. While his title suggests aesthetic beauty, its reality is an upturned urinal signed with Duchamp’s pseudonym, “R. Mutt.” Hannah Höch, a member of the Berlin Dada movement, brings together disparate images taken from mass media in Dada-Ernst (1920-21), offering a penetrating critique of the social construction of gender roles and envisioning the political empowerment of women in Weimar Germany.

Concealing what might be a sewing machine in an army blanket, the mysterious bulging forms of Man Ray’s The Enigma of Isidore Ducasse (1920/1971) illustrate Dada’s tribute to the famous dictum of Comte de Lautréamont (alias Isidore Ducasse): “…beautiful as the chance meeting of a sewing machine and an umbrella on a dissecting table.”

Surrealism’s vibrant legacy can be seen in Mark Dion’s specially commissioned project Package (2006–7), which references Man Ray’s Enigma. The artist sent packages from all over the world to the Israel Museum, with instructions not to open them, but with permission to to x-ray them to discover their enigmatic contents. Dion’s installation features these mystery packages sidebyside with objects from the Museum's collections and with their x-rays displayed on a light box on the opposite wall. In the center of the installation, Dion places a glass case with envelopes selected from Arturo Schwarz’s extensive correspondence with Surrealist artists.

“Dion’s installation shows the artist’s lively engagement with Dada and Surrealist preoccupations,” says Adina Kamien-Kazhdan, Acting Curator of Modern Art at the Israel Museum and curator of the exhibition.“ This continuing tradition is also seen in other works in the exhibition by other contemporary artists in the Museum’s collections, among them Ghada Amar, Boaz Arad, William Kentridge, Eden Ophrat, and Alexis Rockman.

Sponsorship
The exhibition was made possible by: the Sam Weisbord Trust, Beverly Hills; the Estate of Madeleine Chalette Lejwa, New York; and the donors to the Museum’s 2007 Exhibition Fund: Melva Bucksbaum and Raymond J. Learsy, Aspen, Colorado; Ruth and Leon Davidoff, Paris and Mexico City; Hanno D. Mott, New York; and the Nash Family Foundation, New York.

Catalogue
Surrealism and Beyond is accompanied by a 280-page, full-color catalogue, featuring essays by Werner Spies, Dawn Ades, and Adina Kamien-Kazhdan. The catalogue was made possible through the generosity of Nancy Wald, in memory of Benjamin Miller.

The Israel Museum’s Dada and Surrealist Collections
The Israel Museum is recognized as a leading international repository for the research and display of Dada and Surrealist art. The Museum owes the richness of its collections to a consistent history of gifts from patrons over its forty-two year history. First and foremost is Arturo Schwarz, who in 1972 gifted a complete set of readymades by Marcel Duchamp, followed in1991 by his further gift of a rare holding of Dada and Surrealist documents, periodicals, books, manuscripts, and letters. In 1998 Schwarz donated his collection of more than 700 works of Dada, Surrealist, and pre-Surrealist art, including unparalleled holdings of individual artists such as Duchamp and Man Ray within a total ensemble of works by over 200 artists. Remarkable in quality and breadth, the Arturo Schwarz Collection reflects a life committed to the Surrealist spirit and comprises a central core of the Museum’s Dada and Surrealist holdings.

The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
The Israel Museum is the largest cultural institution in the State of Israel and is ranked among the leading art and archaeology museums in the world. Founded in 1965, the Museum houses encyclopedic collections ranging from prehistory through contemporary art. They include the most extensive holdings of Biblical and Holy Land archaeology in the world, among them the Dead Sea Scrolls. In just forty years, the Museum has built a far-ranging collection of nearly 500,000 objects through an unparalleled legacy of gifts and support from its circle of patrons worldwide. It has established itself as an internationally valued institution and a singularly rich cultural resource for Israel, the Middle East, and the world.

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For more information please contact:

Naomi Felicitas Wonnenberg
Foreign press officer
The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
972.2.670.8935
[email protected]

Juliet Sorce / Ariel Handelman
Resnicow Schroeder Associates, New York
212.671-5158 / 5169
jsorce/[email protected]

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Comeback: New Works by Hadas Ophrat

Hadas Ophrat, Seed-Beard (still from the DVD), 2006 (detail) Collection of the artist, courtesy Israel Museum Opening Jan, 18 through June 2007 Five installations by multidisciplinary artist Hadas Ophrat combining sculptural elements with video and sound. The works deal with cycles, contrasts and reconciliations between extremes, and processes of birth and death. All combine a component of absolute order with a powerful emotional and physical element. The central images - gardens, seeds, spice-boxes, female portraits, orchids - are arrayed around the figure of the artist, who appears in the videos, but is also alluded to in the myrtle leaves (hadas in Hebrew) that decorate the garden and are carved in the spiceboxes. The myrtle leaves become the exhibition's "skin," as well as a metaphor for the artist's physical presence in the very spirit and soul of the artwork.

Hadas Ophrat, Seed-Beard (still from the DVD), 2006 (detail) Collection of the artist, courtesy Israel Museum

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Dream Makers: Design Meets Technology
JANUARY 5, ‏2007

Jerusalem, January 16X, 2007 - The Israel Museum presents Dream Makers: Design Meets Technology, an exhibition that explores how design concepts may be transformed into actual objects through use of a rapid prototyping three-dimensional printer. The first exhibition of its kind, Dream Makers brings together the creative energies of 73 Israeli designers commissioned to use this innovative technology in their work. The exhibition, curated by Alex Ward, the Museum’s curator of Design and Architecture, remains on view through June 30, 2007.

Dream Makers portrays a visual journey from the virtual to the physical: from the initial computer design of an object through its transformation to a final prototype. Objects on view are first created and developed as a three-dimensional computer file, then “printed” using the state-of-the-art three-dimensional jet printer developed by Objet Geometries, which builds each form layer by layer until it is complete. The exhibition offers a glimpse into the future, when this technology may be available in the domestic domain, and consumers will be able to download product design files from the Internet and print them at home.

“The Israel Museum has always embraced advancements in design and technology – especially those generated by Israel’s own artists and designers,” states James Snyder, Director of the Museum. “We have an impressive history of projects presenting ground-breaking design innovations to the public, and Dream Makers continues this tradition by showcasing a remarkable emerging technology, with significant creative potential for expanding the boundaries of product design. This project also allows us to feature the creative capabilities of Israel’s design community, in a first ever exhibition of its kind.”

All of the 53 works on display are prototypes that demonstrate a wide range of approaches to this technology – from conceptual and functional objects to those exploring mechanical and structural design challenges. Highlights include: Anticipation by Michal Chen and Roee Shachnai, 2006, a three-dimensional print of a fetus in its 20th week. Morning Glory Lamp by Daniel and Gad Charny uses a telescopic mechanism so that – when fully extended – the lamp measures ten times its original size, reaching 2.3 meters in height. Barak Asher’s Two Acres of Sprouted Thoughts is a three-dimensional representation of our daily e-mails where our personal letters will have a new topography - a combination of three-dimensional type, objects, landscapes and people.

Accompanying the exhibition is a fully-illustrated catalogue and a special film animation describing the technology.

The exhibition is made possible by the generous support of the donors of the Museum’s 2007 Exhibition Fund: Melva Bucksbaum and Raymond J. Learsy, Aspen, Colorado; Ruth and Leon Davidoff, Paris and Mexico City; Hanna D. Mott, New York; The Nash Family Foundation, New York; and Objet Geometries Ltd., Rehovot, Israel.

The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
The Israel Museum is the largest cultural institution in the State of Israel and is ranked among the leading art and archaeology museums in the world. Founded in 1965, the Museum houses encyclopedic collections ranging from prehistory through contemporary art. They include the most extensive holdings of Biblical and Holy Land archaeology in the world, among them the Dead Sea Scrolls. In just forty years, the Museum has built a far-ranging collection of nearly 500,000 objects through an unparalleled legacy of gifts and support from its circle of patrons worldwide. It has established itself as an internationally valued institution and a singularly rich cultural resource for Israel, the Middle East, and the world.

Naomi Felicitas Wonnenberg
Foreign press officer
The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
972.2.670.8935
[email protected]

Juliet Sorce / Ariel Handelman
Resnicow Schroeder Associates, New York
212.671-5158 / 5169
jsorce/[email protected]

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A STATEMENT ON THE DEATH OF TEDDY KOLLEK
JANUARY 2, ‏2007

The entire family of the Israel Museum mourns today the passing of Teddy Kollek.

Teddy's vision shaped the modern landscape of Jerusalem, embracing as its cultural centerpiece the plan for a museum of art, archeology, and the material culture of the Jewish world that would parallel the national museums of other countries worldwide.

From its founding in 1965, Teddy guided the flowering of what would become one of the largest encyclopedic museums in the world, comprising over 500,000 objects spanning the timeline of material culture from pre-historic archeology through contemporary art. He also envisioned the Museum as a vital educational setting where Jerusalem's and Israel's many communities could together learn to appreciate the rich cultural heritage of an intercommunal world. 

With charisma and determination, Teddy also forged an international network of friends - the Museum’s International Council - whose contributions of gifts of works of art and financial support have enabled the Museum to achieve world-class standing in a history of just over forty years - a result which is surely without parallel in the museum world.

"Teddy was visionary in his conception for a museum that would be the jewel in the cultural landscape of modern Jerusalem, in the cultural crown of the modern State of Israel. The comprehensive reach, and sheer physical beauty, of the Museum and its campus are a true testament to his success," states James Snyder, Director of the Museum.

"The Israel Museum today stands as a proud symbol of Israel’s cultural heritage, from the archeology of the ancient Land of Israel to the creativity of Israel’s artists today, seen within the context of world cultural heritage.  Teddy realized this dream through his persuasiveness with a community of supporters from around the world - an achievement almost as remarkable as the Museum itself," states Isaac Molho, Chairman of the Board of the Museum.

Teddy himself, together with his wife Tamar, was also a donor to the Museum, with gifts of archeological objects and historical maps from their private collection.

Teddy served as Chairman of the Museum from 1965 through 1996, and then as President until his designation as Founder in 2000.  On the occasion of the Museum's 25th Anniversary in 1990, he was named Avi Ha Muzeon (Father of the Museum), and he and Tamar were named the 100th Honorary Fellows of the Museum in 2000.  Teddy enjoyed an intense relationship of commitment, caring, and affection with many members of the Museum's staff, its Board, and its International Council, and he will be greatly missed by all of them.

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Studio Morph Design, Wearable Objets, 2006

Dream Makers: Design Meets Technology
Opening Jan, 5 through June 2007

The first museum exhibition of its kind, Dream Makers brings together the best of Objet Geometries' new-age technology and the creative energies of over seventy Israeli designers, working locally and abroad. The exhibition follows a virtual and physical journey, tracing the design of an object from a three-dimensional inkjet printer that magically build up the object, layer by layer, until the final form is completed. The objects -all prototypes - demonstrate a wide range of approaches, from the conceptual and the functional to the exploration of mechanisms, intricate structures, and surface textures.

Studio Morph Design, Wearable Objets, 2006


 

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Noa Gross photographed homes in which she is employed as a cleaner. As part of the exhibition, she also cleaned the upper, once-residential, floor of Ticho House, and this video explores the reactions of visitors who were present at the time. Dana Levy filmed the endless creation, disintegration and regeneration of a tree house to produce a video work entitled . Uri Gershuni photographed the home of his father, the eminent painter Moshe Gershuni, after adding cyclamen plants that allude to his father’s artistic legacy. Yuval Yairi created a photographic mosaic of the Jerusalem Hansen’s disease hospital, once commonly known as the Leper House and regarded as a mysterious, frightening place. The windswept apartment in Ruti Nemet’s series of images seems to have been abandoned in haste. Pavel Wolberg accompanied an IDF unit into Jenin and photographed soldiers who had taken over a private home. Aya Ben Ron’s video is screened on the upper floor, where Dr. Albert and Anna Ticho lived, adjacent to Dr. Ticho’s study. Like Ticho House, the space filmed by Ben Ron served as both a home and a clinic – the gynecology clinic of the artist’s grandmother and the scene of intimate and dramatic moments in her family and in the lives of women from the Haifa area. Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Noa Gross photographed homes in which she is employed as a cleaner. As part of the exhibition, she also cleaned the upper, once-residential, floor of Ticho House, and this video explores the reactions of visitors who were present at the time. Dana Levy filmed the endless creation, disintegration and regeneration of a tree house to produce a video work entitled . Uri Gershuni photographed the home of his father, the eminent painter Moshe Gershuni, after adding cyclamen plants that allude to his father’s artistic legacy. Yuval Yairi created a photographic mosaic of the Jerusalem Hansen’s disease hospital, once commonly known as the Leper House and regarded as a mysterious, frightening place. The windswept apartment in Ruti Nemet’s series of images seems to have been abandoned in haste. Pavel Wolberg accompanied an IDF unit into Jenin and photographed soldiers who had taken over a private home. Aya Ben Ron’s video is screened on the upper floor, where Dr. Albert and Anna Ticho lived, adjacent to Dr. Ticho’s study. Like Ticho House, the space filmed by Ben Ron served as both a home and a clinic – the gynecology clinic of the artist’s grandmother and the scene of intimate and dramatic moments in her family and in the lives of women from the Haifa area. Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.  Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Noa Gross photographed homes in which she is employed as a cleaner. As part of the exhibition, she also cleaned the upper, once-residential, floor of Ticho House, and this video explores the reactions of visitors who were present at the time. Dana Levy filmed the endless creation, disintegration and regeneration of a tree house to produce a video work entitled . Uri Gershuni photographed the home of his father, the eminent painter Moshe Gershuni, after adding cyclamen plants that allude to his father’s artistic legacy. Yuval Yairi created a photographic mosaic of the Jerusalem Hansen’s disease hospital, once commonly known as the Leper House and regarded as a mysterious, frightening place. The windswept apartment in Ruti Nemet’s series of images seems to have been abandoned in haste. Pavel Wolberg accompanied an IDF unit into Jenin and photographed soldiers who had taken over a private home. Aya Ben Ron’s video is screened on the upper floor, where Dr. Albert and Anna Ticho lived, adjacent to Dr. Ticho’s study. Like Ticho House, the space filmed by Ben Ron served as both a home and a clinic – the gynecology clinic of the artist’s grandmother and the scene of intimate and dramatic moments in her family and in the lives of women from the Haifa area. Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.  Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Noa Gross photographed homes in which she is employed as a cleaner. As part of the exhibition, she also cleaned the upper, once-residential, floor of Ticho House, and this video explores the reactions of visitors who were present at the time. Dana Levy filmed the endless creation, disintegration and regeneration of a tree house to produce a video work entitled . Uri Gershuni photographed the home of his father, the eminent painter Moshe Gershuni, after adding cyclamen plants that allude to his father’s artistic legacy. Yuval Yairi created a photographic mosaic of the Jerusalem Hansen’s disease hospital, once commonly known as the Leper House and regarded as a mysterious, frightening place. The windswept apartment in Ruti Nemet’s series of images seems to have been abandoned in haste. Pavel Wolberg accompanied an IDF unit into Jenin and photographed soldiers who had taken over a private home. Aya Ben Ron’s video is screened on the upper floor, where Dr. Albert and Anna Ticho lived, adjacent to Dr. Ticho’s study. Like Ticho House, the space filmed by Ben Ron served as both a home and a clinic – the gynecology clinic of the artist’s grandmother and the scene of intimate and dramatic moments in her family and in the lives of women from the Haifa area. Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.  Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

The Homes of Others: Video Art and Photography by Contemporary Israeli Artists on View from March 7 through May 14, 2008 Noa Gross photographed homes in which she is employed as a cleaner. As part of the exhibition, she also cleaned the upper, once-residential, floor of Ticho House, and this video explores the reactions of visitors who were present at the time. Dana Levy filmed the endless creation, disintegration and regeneration of a tree house to produce a video work entitled . Uri Gershuni photographed the home of his father, the eminent painter Moshe Gershuni, after adding cyclamen plants that allude to his father’s artistic legacy. Yuval Yairi created a photographic mosaic of the Jerusalem Hansen’s disease hospital, once commonly known as the Leper House and regarded as a mysterious, frightening place. The windswept apartment in Ruti Nemet’s series of images seems to have been abandoned in haste. Pavel Wolberg accompanied an IDF unit into Jenin and photographed soldiers who had taken over a private home. Aya Ben Ron’s video is screened on the upper floor, where Dr. Albert and Anna Ticho lived, adjacent to Dr. Ticho’s study. Like Ticho House, the space filmed by Ben Ron served as both a home and a clinic – the gynecology clinic of the artist’s grandmother and the scene of intimate and dramatic moments in her family and in the lives of women from the Haifa area. Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.  Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

The Homes of Others: Video Art and Photography by Contemporary Israeli Artists on View from March 7 through May 14, 2008   Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.  Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

The Homes of Others: Video Art and Photography by Contemporary Israeli Artists on View from March 7 through May 14, 2008   Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.  Ticho House, situated in Jerusalem's downtown area, is filled with music, old Jerusalem atmosphere and the art of Israel's beloved painter Anna Ticho (1894 -1980). One of the first houses in Jerusalem built outside the Old City walls, the Ticho House is named for Dr. Avraham Ticho and his wife Anna Ticho, the latter of whom bequeathed the house, all of its collections and its library to the people of the city to serve as a public center for art. The Ticho House hosts a permanent exhibition of Anna Ticho's works – mostly Jerusalem landscapes in pencil and charcoal – as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary Israeli artists and works from the collection of the Israel Museum. The Ticho House is an off-site venue of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

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