The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
   Bella and Harry Wexner GalleryBella and Harry Wexner Gallery, Past Exhibitions  
Bella and Harry Wexner Gallery, Past Exhibitions
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Herod the Great: The King's Final Journey
February 13, 2013-January 4, 2014
Curators: Dudi Mevorach and Silvia Rozenberg

The first exhibition entirely dedicated to Herod the Great, Israel’s greatest builder and one of the most controversial figures in Jewish history. Large reconstructions and new finds from Herod’s palaces in Herodium, Jericho, and other sites are on display. Exhibited to the public for the very first time, these artifacts shed new light on the political, architectural, and aesthetic influence of Herod’s rule (37–4 BCE). Herod’s tomb – discovered at Herodium after a 40-year search by the late Prof. Ehud Netzer of the Hebrew University – holds pride of place. The exhibition is held in memory of Prof. Netzer, who fell to his death in 2010 on the site of his discovery.


Handle of a footed marble basin decorated with Seilenoi heads, the 1st century BCE. On loan from SAOJS

A World Apart Next Door: Glimpses into the Life of Hasidic Jews

June 12, 2012-December 1, 2012
This ethnographic exhibition highlight facets of Hasidic culture that may not be known to the wider public. It illustrated the Hasidic experience through the rich, complex attire of men, women, and children and through objects with meaning for the group’s social and spiritual life, which revolves around its charismatic leader, the Rebbe. Photographs, films, and music from life-cycle events and other rituals and celebrations was also presented, offering visitors an opportunity to enter, for a moment, the intriguing world of a vibrant ultra-Orthodox community of today.

Curator: Ester Muchawsky-Schnapper, Curator, Julia and Leo Forchheimer Department of Jewish Ethnography
To the exhibition site

Magic Lantern: Recent Acquisitions in Contemporary Art

November 7, 2011-April 13, 2012
Artists: Adrian Paci, Yehudit Sasportas, Hiraki Sawa, and Maya Zack, among others

Magic Lantern includes a range of new acquisitions and recent gifts of international and Israeli contemporary art, all on view for the first time at the Museum. The works, by artists including  Ann Veronica Janssens, Adrian Paci, Yehudit Sasportas, Hiraki Sawa, and Maya Zack, Jan Tichy, and others, deal with the subject of enchanted and metaphorical landscapes, wondrous interiors, and day-dreams.

Curators: Suzanne Landau,  Talia Amar and Amitai Mendelsohn
To the exhibition website




 

Christian Marclay: The Clock (2010)

August 23, 2011-October 22, 2011


Christian Marclay, The Clock, 2010, single channel video, duration: 24 hours
© the artist, photo: Ben Westoby, courtesy White Cube


On loan from the artist, Christian Marclay's video work The Clock (2010) is an internationally acclaimed masterwork of video art, composed of thousands of film excerpts illuminating the passage of time by means of time-related references, among them images of clocks, watches, or announcements identifying specific times of the day. Marclay extracted each of these moments from its original context to form a 24-hour montage that unfolds according to his reconstruction in real time.

The Clock premiered in London in October, 2010, and has since been presented in New York, Los Angeles, Venice, and Moscow. Twenty-four-hour screenings have attracted long lines and captivated audiences, with many viewers staying to absorb the work for hours at a time. Marclay won the coveted Golden Lion award at the 2011 Venice Biennale, where The Clock was featured in the Biennale’s central exhibition. “Synchronized with local time at each exhibition venue, Marclay's The Clock conflates cinematic and actual time, revealing each passing moment as a wellspring of alternately suspenseful, tragic, and romantic narrative possibilities. By referencing actual time specifically, wherever it is on display, The Clock transforms the usual sensation of artificial “cinematic time” into the thrilling sensation of real time in the exhibition gallery.

Collage has been a recurring strategy for American artist Christian Marclay since the late 1970s, when, as a pioneering turntablist, he began mixing sounds and recordings before turning to an ever wider range of mediums, including sculpture, photography, and performance. His video work often involves audiovisual assemblage compiled from film excerpts, recontextualizing fragments of modern movie culture into new creative compositions.





William Kentridge: Five Themes

March 5, 2011-July 30, 2011
To the exhibition site

Artists’ Choices: Zvi Goldstein, Susan Hiller, Yinka Shonibare

This three-part exhibition was curated by renowned artists Zvi Goldstein, Susan Hiller, and Yinka Shonibare, each of whom offered a fresh look at the Museum’s encyclopedic holdings by juxtaposing works from all three of its collection wings. Unique in its scope and character, the project showcased masterworks from across the Museum’s collections and presented a dialogue between the collections and the artists themselves.
Artists' Choices - Susan Hiller: A Work in Progress
July 26, 2010-January 8, 2011
>> read on




Artists' Choices - Yinka Shonibare: Earth, Wind, Fire, and Water


July 26, 2010-January 8, 2011>> read on

Artists' Choices - Zvi Goldstein: Haunted by Objects
July 26, 2010-January 8, 2011
>> read on


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