The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
   Press Releases July-Dec 2011  
Press Releases July-Dec 2011
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About the Israel Museum, Jerusalem

The Israel Museum is the largest cultural institution in the State of Israel and is ranked among the world’s leading art and archaeology museums. Founded in 1965, the Museum houses encyclopedic collections, including works dating from prehistory to the present day, in its Archaeology, Fine Arts, and Jewish Art and Life Wings, and features the most extensive holdings of biblical and Holy Land archaeology in the world....More

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Angels at the Israel Museum: Divine Messengers: Angels in Art


Pieter Lastman, Hagar and the Angel in the Wilderness, ca.1625

On view from December 20, 2011 – Just in time for the holidays, a new exhibition at the Israel Museum explores the theme of angels in art. Divine Messengers: Angels in Art, featuring 30 works culled mainly from the Israel Museum collection, presents the angel not only as a creature that travels between different worlds, but also as one that is common to all  humankind regardless of time, place, and faith. On display are Paul Klee's masterwork Angelus Novus (1920), works by the Baroque painters Govaert Flinck, Pieter Lastman and Pedro Orrente, prints by Gustave Dore depicting scenes from the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, paintings from the Cuzco Spanish-colonial school, Islamic art, and illuminated Jewish marriage contracts. The exhibition is on view from December 20, 2011 - October 27, 2012.

Throughout the centuries, artists have attempted to portray the familiar yet mysterious figure of the angel – those winged, ageless spiritual beings variously known as cupids, cherubs, seraphs, or archangels. In Christian art, angels are traditionally portrayed as winged children very similar to cupids – or putti as they are sometimes called – youngsters whose gender is ambiguous and who have large wings attached to their shoulder blades. This image probably derives from representations of Hermes, messenger of the gods in Greek mythology. As bearers of God's message, angels, cherubs, and seraphs feature prominently in Christian art, which is closely related to the stories of the Bible.

This highly influential visual tradition left its mark on Jewish art as well, as seen, for example, in illuminated ketubbot (Jewish marriage contracts) from Italy and North Africa, in which protective angels surround the bride and groom under the wedding canopy. Angels conceived as sublime creatures endowed with magical powers are also found in illuminated manuscripts and miniatures from Islamic countries, which describe scenes from the lives of the Prophet Muhammad and famous poets.

Divine Messengers also features a number of works of 20th-century and Israeli art. In spite – or perhaps because – of the crisis of faith engendered by World War II, the angel is still present in Modern and contemporary art, including cinema, often portrayed as a rebellious or lost creature without a place of its own neither above nor below.

The exhibition is curated by Shlomit Steinberg, Hans Dichand Curator of European Art.


  

 

Israel Museum Premieres New Project by Sharon Lockhart Based on Works by Israeli Dance Composer Noa Eshkol


Noa Eshkol, Five Dances and Nine Wall Carpets, Video

Jerusalem, December 8, 2011 – The Israel Museum presents the premiere of a new project by  the noted American artist Sharon Lockhart, exploring the work of prominent Israeli dance composer Noa Eshkol (1924–2007). Opening December 13, Sharon Lockhart | Noa Eshkol will feature a new film installation and photographic series by Lockhart inspired by Eshkol and the Eshkol-Wachman Movement Notation (EWMN) System, which Eshkol developed together with architect Avraham Wachman to describe human locomotion. Also on view will be a selection of wall carpets created by Eshkol, as well as scores, drawings, and other archival material pertaining to her work, creating an encounter between the two artists that raises questions about the nature of artistic practice, its preservation and its interpretation. Sharon Lockhart | Noa Eshkol will be on view at the Israel Museum from December 13, 2011, through April 30, 2012.

“We feel privileged to have this opportunity to present a unique project bringing together the visions of two notable artists, each working in different aspects of contemporary creativity” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “We look forward to sharing with our audiences Sharon Lockhart’s illuminating exploration of the work of Noa Eshkol, showing each artist’s accomplishment in a new light.”

The EWMN System, developed in the 1950s, combines symbols and numbers to represent spatial relationships between different parts of the body, in order to describe virtually every possible human movement. Eshkol devoted her life to perfecting this system and developed a practice of dance based on the simple structures written within the system, using only the sound of a metronome to key proper timing.

Sharon Lockhart's five-channel film installation, Five Dances and Nine Wall Carpets by Noa Eshkol (2011), features five of Eshkol’s dances performed by members of her former company.Each is staged among different groupings of Eshkol’s wall carpets and projected onto rectangular volumes within the exhibition space. The variations of composition in each frame highlight the relationships between eachdance and the accompanying textile works, which have never before been presented together. The dancers on each of the five channels perform to the sound of separate metronomes, and together, the five metronome beats create a new musical composition for the exhibition.

Lockhart has also created a photographic study of the seven spherical models that illustrate the EWMN System, titled Models of Orbits in the System of Reference, Eshkol-Wachman Movement Notation System (2011). The system defines the three-dimensional movement of any limb around its joint as a sphere, describing this circular movement as a rotary, conical or planar. Because the movement represented by each sphere looks different depending on the moving body’s relationship to the viewer, Lockhart photographed each wire and mesh sphere spinning around its longitudinal axis.

In addition to her innovative work as a choreographer, Noa Eshkol was an accomplished textile artist. Over the course of her career, she created 1,800 wall carpets out of scraps of fabric that she composed and that her dancers sewed onto backings. Three of her carpets will be on display in the exhibition, alongside drawings and scores that record early stages in the development of the EWMN System and additional documentary material from the Eshkol archive housed in the Wachman Movement Notation (EWMN) Center in Holon.

Sharon Lockhart, known internationally for her works in photography and video, became acquainted with the oeuvre of Noa Eshkol during a visit to Israel several years ago. Lockhart explored the many dimensions of Eshkol's work through archival research at the EWMN Center and through observation of the activities of veteran dancers from Eshkol's own ensemble, the Chamber Dance Group. Some of Eshkol's dancers, who worked under her tutelage in daily movement and notation for most of their lives, continue to be involved in perpetuating her legacy and participated in Lockhart's project.

Sharon Lockhart | Noa Eshkol is curated at the Israel Museum by Talia Amar, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art. The five-channel film installation debuts at The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, and then travels to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in June, 2012. A companion exhibition on Sharon Lockhart and Noa Eshkol is on view at the Center for Contemporary Art in Tel Aviv from December 15, 2011.


  

Magic Lantern: Recent Acquisitions in Contemporary Art 

 
Hiraki Sawa, Going Places Sitting Down, 2004, Three-channel video projection, 8:30 mins., Purchase, Contemporary Art Acquisitions Committee of  American Friends of the Israel Museum, New York

Jerusalem, November 10, 2011 – The Israel Museum's collection of contemporary art is constantly growing, with the help of many friends whose generosity enables us to focus our new acquisitions on particular directions, subjects, and mediums. Thus the present exhibition is devoted to works that are all being displayed for the first time and are interconnected by a shared theme: enchantment.

Magic Lantern embraces a range of mediums – installation, photography, video, film – and even hearkens back to the earliest way in which images were projected onto a screen, seemingly miraculously, as intangible specters. Whether landscapes or interior scenes, the works seen here invoke the world of legend, daydream, fantasy, and illusion: imaginary journeys, blurred silhouettes in the mist, flickering flames, dark forest shadows. What we think we know about the real world assumes the diffuse contours of something magical. Poetic reflections on a fragile butterfly-wing beauty that shows itself and then vanishes; an intimate twilight voyage guided by light and shadow.

Magic Lantern is curated by Suzanne Landau, Yulla and Jacques Lipchitz Chief Curator of the Fine Arts and Landeau Family Curator of Contemporary Art.

The exhibition online>>>


  

Works by Jewish Avant-Garde Artists from Romania on View for the First Time in Israel


Victor  Brauner, To my beloved Sara Pana, 1930

Jerusalem, November 10, 2011 – The Israel Museum presents a new exhibition that traces the artistic development of seven Jewish artists from Romania – Tristan Tzara, Victor Brauner, Marcel Janco, M. H. Maxy, Arthur Segal, Jules Perahim, and Paul Păun – who, in the early decades of the twentieth century, took the art world by storm through their fearless experimentation. After a successful presentation at the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam, Jewish Avant-Garde Artists from Romania brings to Israel for the first time ninety works, created between 1910 and 1938, that explore the question of center and periphery, and illuminate the role of Jewish artists in the avant-garde movement. The exhibition opens on November 11 and remains on view through February 18, 2012.

During World War I, Tristan Tzara and Marcel Janco were central to the development of Dada in neutral Zurich, in venues such as Cabaret Voltaire. Back in Romania in the 1920s, Tzara and Janco, together with Victor Brauner, M. H. Maxy, and Arthur Segal, were involved in the publication of avant-garde magazines Contimporanul, 75 HP, Punct, and Integral, and organized the First International Art Exhibition of Contimporanul. The 1930s brought a younger generation of artists into the conversation, such as Jules Perahim and Paul Păun. New avant-garde magazines Unu and Alge were introduced, and Bucharest became a central point of activity in the Surrealist movement. Jewish Avant-Garde Artists from Romania explores Segal’s Neo-Impressionist art, Tzara’s Dada experiments, Brauner’s Surrealist works, Janco’s masks, landscapes, and genre scenes, Maxy’s growing interest in social themes, and the involvement of Jules Perahim and Paul Păun at the forefront of Surrealism, shedding light on the central role these artists played in the history of European avant-garde art.

The Romanian art scene in the early twentieth century, and particularly the contributions of artists of Jewish origin, have previously received little serious study by art historians, due to the deeply ingrained anti-Semitism of the Eastern Bloc at the time and in the decades that followed. This exhibition underscores the long-neglected importance of Bucharest tin the development of the European avant-garde, and explores the relationship between Jewish identity and radical modernity.

Jewish Avant-Garde Artists from Romania was organized by the Jewish Historical Museum, Amsterdam, and curated by Radu Stern and Edward van Voolen. At the Israel Museum, the exhibition is organized by Adina Kamien-Kazhdan, David Rockefeller Curator of the Stella Fischbach Department of Modern Art.


  

Israel Museum Announces Plans to Refine and Strengthen its Collections

Jerusalem, September 30, 2011 – Following the first comprehensive evaluation of its nearly 500,000 object collection since its founding in 1965, the Israel Museum announced today that it will de-accession a group of 39 works as part of a carefully focused plan to refine and strengthen its holdings. Proceeds from the sales, which will be conducted by Sotheby’s this coming November through February in New York and London, will benefit the acquisition funds of the Museum’s Modern Art Department. The collection review and complete collection re-installation that followed it were central elements of the Museum’s campus renewal project, completed in July 2010, which included the creation of new galleries, orientation facilities, and public spaces.

“Last summer, the Israel Museum celebrated the completion of its comprehensive three-year campus renewal program, including the redesign and reinstallation of all of its collection galleries for Archeology, Jewish Art and Life, and the Fine Arts. As a part of this process, the Museum conducted an extensive evaluation of its holdings, which have grown dramatically since the Museum’s founding in 1965 thanks to the generosity of donors and friends worldwide,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “In an effort to refine and strengthen these holdings, the Museum is now implementing a carefully focused de-accessioning plan to eliminate redundancies and generate funds for the targeted acquisition of works, which will amplify focal points in the collection and fill gaps where they exist.”

Details about the Sotheby’s sales and the works to be included are available online here.

The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
The Israel Museum is the largest cultural institution in the State of Israel and is ranked among the leading art and archaeology museums in the world. Founded in 1965, the Museum houses encyclopedic collections ranging from prehistory through contemporary art and includes the most extensive holdings of Biblical and Holy Land archaeology in the world, among them the Dead Sea Scrolls. In just 45 years, the Museum has built a far-ranging collection of nearly 500,000 objects through an unparalleled legacy of gifts and support from its circle of patrons worldwide. In 2010, the Museum completed a comprehensive renewal of its campus led by James Carpenter Design Associates, New York, and Efrat-Kowalsky Architects, Tel Aviv, including the creation of new galleries, orientation facilities, and public spaces, and the complete reinstallation of its encyclopedic collections. The Museum also organizes and presents programming at its off-site locations in Jerusalem at the Rockefeller Archaeological Museum, where it presents archaeological artifacts from the Land of Israel, and at its historic Ticho House in downtown Jerusalem, a venue for exhibitions of contemporary Israeli art. 


Dead Sea Scrolls Go Digital on New Interactive Website Created by the Israel Museum and Google

Ultra Hi-Res Imagery and Google Technology Enable Users Worldwide to Explore Oldest Known Biblical Manuscript as Never Before

The Official Google Blog>>>
 
September 26, 2011  Jerusalem, Israel – The Israel Museum launches today its Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Project, allowing users to examine and explore these ancient manuscripts from Second Temple times at a level of detail never before possible. Developed in partnership with Google, the new website gives users access to searchable, fast-loading, high-resolution images of the scrolls, as well as short explanatory videos and background information on the texts and their history. The Dead Sea Scrolls, which include the oldest known biblical manuscripts in existence, offer critical insight into Jewish society in the Land of Israel during the Second Temple Period, the time of the birth of Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism. Five complete scrolls from the Israel Museum have been digitized for the project at this stage and are accessible online at dss.collections.imj.org.il.

“We are privileged to house in the Israel Museum's Shrine of the Book the best preserved and most complete Dead Sea Scrolls ever discovered,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. "They are of paramount importance among the touchstones of monotheistic world heritage, and they represent unique highlights of our Museum's encyclopedic holdings. Now, through our partnership with Google, we are able to bring these treasures to the broadest possible public."

The five Dead Sea Scrolls that have been digitized thus far include the Great Isaiah Scroll, the Community Rule Scroll, the Commentary on Habakkuk Scroll, the Temple Scroll, and the War Scroll, with search queries on Google.com sending users directly to the online scrolls. All five scrolls can be magnified so that users may examine texts in exacting detail. Details invisible to the naked eye are made visible through ultra-high resolution digital photography by photographer Ardon Bar-Hama– at up to 1,200 mega pixels each, these images are almost two hundred times higher in resolution than those produced by a standard camera. Each picture utilized UV-protected flash tubes with an exposure of 1/4000th of a second to minimize damage to the fragile manuscripts. In addition, the Great Isaiah Scroll may be searched by column, chapter, and verse, and is accompanied by an English translation tool and by an option for users to submit translations of verses in their own languages.

“The Dead Sea Scrolls Project with the Israel Museum enriches and preserves an important part of world heritage by making it accessible to all on the internet,” said Professor Yossi Matias, Managing Director of Google’s R&D Center in Israel. “Having been involved in similar projects in the past, including the Google Art Project, Yad Vashem Holocaust Collection, and the Prado Museum in Madrid, we have seen how people around the world can enhance their knowledge and understanding of key historical events by accessing documents and collections online. We hope to make all existing knowledge in historical archives and collections available to all, including helping to put additional Dead Sea Scroll documents online.”

The Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Project is funded by George Blumenthal and the Center for Online Judaic Studies, which first envisioned the project in order to make these manuscripts widely accessible and to create an innovative resource for scholars and the public alike. Dr. Adolfo D. Roitman, Lizbeth and George Krupp Curator of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Head of the Shrine of the Book, and Dr. Susan Hazan, Curator of New Media and Head of the Museum's Internet Office, directed the project for the Israel Museum, working in collaboration with Eyal Fink, Technical Lead, and Eyal Miller, New Business Development Manager, at Google's R&D Center in Israel.

About the Dead Sea Scrolls

Dating from the third century BCE to the first century CE, the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered between 1947 and 1956 in eleven caves on the northwestern shores of the Dead Sea. The manuscripts are generally attributed to an isolated Jewish sect, referred to in the scrolls as “the Community,” who settled in Qumran in the Judean desert.

The Israel Museum has been home to the Dead Sea Scrolls since its opening in 1965. The light-sensitive scrolls are housed and exhibited in the Shrine of the Book, designed by Armand Bartos and Frederic Kiesler, whose signature dome evokes the lids of the jars in which the scrolls were found. The scrolls that are now digitized and accessible through the Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Project include:

• The Great Isaiah Scroll, inscribed with the Book of Isaiah and dating from ca. 125 BCE, is the only complete ancient copy of any biblical book in existence.
• The War Scroll dates to the late first century BCE or early first century CE and describes a confrontation between the “Sons of Light” and the “Sons of Darkness”, which would last forty-nine years, ending with the victory of the “Sons of Light” and the restoration of Temple practice according to their beliefs.
• The Temple Scroll, from the early first century CE, claims to provide the details of God’s instructions for the construction and operation of the Temple in Jerusalem. Written on animal skin only one-tenth of a millimeter thick, the Temple Scroll is the thinnest parchment scroll ever found among the Dead Sea Scrolls.
• The Community Rule sheds light on the Community’s way of life, dealing with subjects such as the admission of new members, conduct at communal meals, prayer, cleansing rituals, and theological doctrines.
• The Commentary on Habakkuk interprets the first two chapters of the biblical book of the prophet Habakkuk in a unique style that makes it a key source of knowledge of the spiritual life of the secluded Qumran community, shedding light on the community's perception of itself.


 

Israel Museum Restitutes Painting by Max Liebermann to Artist's Heirs

Jerusalem, September 8, 2011 – The Israel Museum announced today the restitution of the painting The Return of Tobias, c. 1934, by the German-Jewish artist Max Liebermann (1847-1935), to the artist's heirs. The work was looted from the Jewish Museum in Berlin, where it was on loan from the artist, in the 1930s. The painting was received in 1955 by the Israel Museum's precursor, the Bezalel National Museum, through the Jewish Restitution Successor Organization (JRSO), established after World War II to distribute to cultural organizations around the globe looted works of art whose owners or heirs were unknown.

Completed late in Liebermann's life, the oil painting The Return of Tobias depicts a scene from the Book of Tobit in which Tobit's son returns home with a cure for his father's blindness. The restitution of the work to the heirs of Max and Martha Liebermann follows recent research that revealed that the painting was from the artist's personal collection. Previously the painting had been believed to be another work by Liebermann of the same title, which was also looted from the Jewish Museum in Berlin.

The collection of Max and Martha Liebermann comprised several thousand paintings and drawings, the vast majority of which were dispersed and lost between 1935 and 1943, either sold under duress or expropriated immediately following Martha Liebermann's death. The family's efforts to trace the collection in the 1950s and 1960s were unsuccessful, but recent research has identified several lost works, and The Return of Tobias is the third to be restored to the family. Following its restitution, the painting is being presented in the exhibition The Berlin Jewish Museum (1933-1938): Traces of a Lost Collection, curated by Chana Schuetz and on view at Berlin's Centrum Judaicum from September 10 through December 31, 2011.

"We are pleased to be able to restitute The Return of Tobias to the heirs of Max Liebermann," said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. "Our Museum strives to serve as a model for responsible restitution, and it is gratifying when ongoing scholarship and research relating to works received through JRSO result in their return."

Beginning in 1948, works of art and Judaica that were identified as having been looted from Jews or Jewish communities but were heirless and unclaimed were released from their Central Collecting Points in Germany and given to JRSO, which undertook a systematic program to distribute this cultural legacy among museums, synagogues, and other Jewish organizations worldwide. Between 1952 and late 1954, JRSO discovered in Berlin's Office of the Administration of Properties paintings that had been looted from the Reichsvereinigung der Juden in Germany. This association, to which Jews were forced to belong, was formed as a result of the second Nuremberg law, which stripped Jews of their German citizenship. Most of the paintings discovered, including The Return of Tobias, came from the Jewish Museum in Berlin.

The Return of Tobias was one of roughly 250 paintings, 250 works on paper, and 700 objects of Judaica deposited by JRSO for safekeeping at the Bezalel National Museum, precursor to the Israel Museum, which became their custodian following its establishment in 1965. Through the years, the Museum has exhibited and published many of these works, which have been catalogued and accessible in a special section on the Museum's website since 2007.

The restitution of The Return of Tobias continues the Museum's history of significant restitutions, including most recently the return of the Paul Klee drawing Veil Dance, 1920, to the estate of German art collector Harry Fuld Jr., in 2010. In 2008, two ancient Roman gold-glass medallions were restituted to the heirs to the Dzialynska Collection at Goluchow Castle in Poland. The Museum reacquired one medallion for its collection, and the second was purchased and placed with the Museum on extended loan. Among other examples in recent years, in 2005, Edgar Degas' charcoal drawing Four Nude Female Dancers Resting, ca. 1898, was restituted to the heirs of Jacques Goudstikker, a noted Dutch art dealer who died while fleeing the Nazi invasion of the Netherlands. And, in 2000, the Museum returned Camille Pissarro's Boulevard Montmarte, 1897, to the heir to Holocaust victim Max Silberberg, who placed the painting on long-term loan to the Museum.


Israel Museum Welcomes One Millionth Visitor Since Inauguration of Renewed Campus

Jerusalem, August 21, 2011 – In an unprecedented achievement for an Israeli cultural institution, the Israel Museum is proud to announce that it has welcomed one million people to its renewed campus since its inauguration one year ago. During this time, visitors have enjoyed the Museum’s renewed galleries, new architecture and rich program of exhibitions, events and activities.

Programming highlights included the inaugural exhibition Artists’ Choices: Zvi Goldstein, Susan Hiller, Yinka Shonibare, a three-part presentation that juxtaposed works from all three of the Museum’s collection wings; the major traveling exhibition William Kentridge: Five Themes, which  drew over 200,000 visitors to the Museum during its five-month showing; “Contact Point,” a night of one-time encounters among artists, writers, and performers with artworks through the Museum’s galleries and campus; and the unveiling of two monumentally-scaled site specific installations: Olafur Eliasson’s Whenever the rainbow appears (2010), and Anish Kapoor’s Turning The World Upside Down, Jerusalem (2010), created for the Museum’s renewal.

Amir Mahol from Kibbutz Hulda and his daughters Noga and Maayan were welcomed at the entrance to the Museum today with the news that they were the one millionth visitor(s) since the inauguration of the renewed Museum. James Snyder and Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat were on hand to greet the surprised visitors and present them with a lifetime family membership to the Museum, a collection catalogue, and an invitation to a private behind-the-scenes tour.

"In just a year, one million visitors from around the world have made the renewed Israel Museum the cornerstone of culture for the city of Jerusalem," said Mayor of Jerusalem Nir Barkat. "After a tremendous amount of investment, creative thinking, beautiful design, and visionary management, the Israel Museum is now one of the world’s top cultural institutions. The people of Jerusalem are honored by and appreciative of this great symbol of Jerusalem’s cultural revolution."

Inaugurated officially on July 25, 2010, and featuring new collection and exhibition galleries, orientation facilities, and public spaces, the Israel Museum’s three-year renewal project was designed to enhance visitor experience of the Museum’s art, architecture, and surrounding landscape, in complement to its original design. Led by James Carpenter Design Associates of New York and Efrat-Kowalsky Architects of Tel Aviv, the $100-million project also included the comprehensive redesign and reinstallation of its encyclopedic collections throughout the Museum’s three collection wings – for archaeology, the fine arts, and Jewish art and life.


  

Christian Marclay's Masterpiece The Clock On View at the Israel Museum August 23 – October 20

Acclaimed Video Work Has Captivated Audiences Worldwide,
Receiving the Prestigious Golden Lion Award at 2011 Venice Biennale

Jerusalem, August 14, 2011 – The Israel Museum is pleased to announce the exhibition of Christian Marclay's video work The Clock (2010). On loan from the artist, this internationally acclaimed masterwork of video art is composed of thousands of film excerpts illuminating the passage of time by means of time-related references, among them images of clocks, watches, or announcements identifying specific times of the day. Marclay extracted each of these moments from its original context to form a 24-hour montage that unfolds according to his reconstruction in real time.

Jerusalem, – The Israel Museum is pleased to announce the exhibition of Christian Marclay's video work The Clock (2010). On loan from the artist, this internationally acclaimed masterwork of video art is composed of thousands of film excerpts illuminating the passage of time by means of time-related references, among them images of clocks, watches, or announcements identifying specific times of the day. Marclay extracted each of these moments from its original context to form a 24-hour montage that unfolds according to his reconstruction in real time.

The Clock premiered in London in October, 2010, and has since been presented in New York, Los Angeles, Venice, and Moscow. Twenty-four-hour screenings have attracted long lines and captivated audiences, with many viewers staying to absorb the work for hours at a time. Marclay won the coveted Golden Lion award at the 2011 Venice Biennale, where The Clock was featured in the Biennale’s central exhibition. The work will begin its first Israeli screening at the Israel Museum on August 23 and will remain on view through October 20, 2011.

“In a time when video art has become such a central medium in contemporary creativity, we are pleased have this opportunity to share Marclay's masterful new creation with our audiences and grateful to the artist for the generous loan that makes this presentation possible,” says James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum.

Synchronized with local time at each exhibition venue, Marclay's The Clock conflates cinematic and actual time, revealing each passing moment as a wellspring of alternately suspenseful, tragic, and romantic narrative possibilities. By referencing actual time specifically, wherever it is on display, The Clock transforms the usual sensation of artificial “cinematic time” into the thrilling sensation of real time in the exhibition gallery.

Collage has been a recurring strategy for American artist Christian Marclay since the late 1970s, when, as a pioneering turntablist, he began mixing sounds and recordings before turning to an ever wider range of mediums, including sculpture, photography, and performance. His video work often involves audiovisual assemblage compiled from film excerpts, recontextualizing fragments of modern movie culture into new creative compositions.

The Israel Museum’s presentation of The Clock is curated by Suzanne Landau, Yulla and Jacques Lipchitz Chief Curator of the Fine Arts and Landeau Family Curator of Contemporary Art.

 


 

All-Night Arts Festival at the Israel Museum on July 14

“Contact Point” Offers an Evening of Site-Specific Artistic Encounters throughout the Museum Campus

Jerusalem, June 28, 2011 – The Israel Museum and the Jerusalem Season of Culture present the second annual all-night arts festival, “Contact Point,” on July 14. This unique event offers visitors an entirely different museum experience, as thirty artists, writers, and performers engage with works of art across the Museum's campus. The evening culminates in a magical Wi Party, a silent dance party in which guests gather under the open sky and dance to music played through wireless headphones. The party takes place surrounding Anish Kapoor’s Turning the World Upside Down, Jerusalem (2010) on the Museum's Crown Plaza, the highest outdoor point on its campus.

Jerusalem, – The Israel Museum and the Jerusalem Season of Culture present the second annual all-night arts festival, “Contact Point,” on . This unique event offers visitors an entirely different museum experience, as thirty artists, writers, and performers engage with works of art across the Museum's campus. The evening culminates in a magical Wi Party, a silent dance party in which guests gather under the open sky and dance to music played through wireless headphones. The party takes place surrounding Anish Kapoor’s (2010) on the Museum's Crown Plaza, the highest outdoor point on its campus.

Throughout the night, Museum-goers will have the singular opportunity to experience artistic encounters in dance, music, word, and performance that respond directly to the Museum’s art and architecture. Participants include: Gil Alon, Menahem Ben, Broken Fingaz, Dikla, Ruti Direktor, Shai Golden, Sharon Kantor, Karolina, Sigalit Landau, Ram Matza, Kobi Meidan, the Sirenot Ensemble, Yossi Sarid, Smadar Sheffi, Daniella Weiss, and Yigal Zalmona, among others.

"Contact Point is a unique celebration of culture and creativity in which artists of all kinds interact with works of art, landscape, and architecture throughout the Museum’s campus," said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. "We are delighted to invite the public to experience the Museum in this new and exciting way.    

"Contact Point, a thoroughly original museum experience, offers an alternative way to consume art," said Nir Turk, the artistic director of Contact Point. "The contact point is the eye of the consumer."

Highlights of the evening include:

"Foreign Work" – This one-time collaboration among five dancers from major Israeli dance companies hailing from different countries offers the audience a unique perspective on what it means to be "foreign" in Israel. The performance will be staged at the feet of Ohad Meromi's Boy from South Tel Aviv (2001) in the Museum's Upper Entrance Hall.

"For More Information, Please Dial…" – An interactive project in which visitors can call in questions to art experts to gain insights about works of art on view in the galleries. The four-member panel of experts, all curators or professional art critics, will be on stage in the Museum's Springer Auditorium, where audience members can also "dial in" to listen to their explanations.

“A Little Bit of Love” – Musical performances by Karolina and Dikla about things they love will be presented next to Robert Indiana's AHAVA (1977) in the Billy Rose Art Garden.

Contact Point is organized by the Israel Museum and the Jerusalem Season of Culture. Entrance to the event is included in Museum admission. The complete program will be available online one week prior to the event at: www.jerusalemseason.com. For tickets, please call 02-6771300. Highlights from last year's Contact Point can be seen on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRYHnSOrZMo.

The Jerusalem Season of Culture

The Jerusalem Season of Culture (JSOC) is a newly launched annual summer showcase of the city's contemporary cultural treasures. From mid-May through the end of July, the city hosts a series of riveting artistic experiences in dance, music, poetry, philosophy, visual art, new media, and more. Created as an initiative of the Schusterman Foundation–Israel, JSOC is modeled on prominent international cultural festivals and seasons worldwide and puts a spotlight on Jerusalem's flourishing arts scene through an impressive series of cultural events that are rooted in the city's unique cultural DNA. JSOC's co-directors are Naomi Bloch-Fortis and David Gappell. Artistic director is Itay Mautner.


  

About the Israel Museum

The Israel Museum is the largest cultural institution in the State of Israel and is ranked among the world’s leading art and archaeology museums. Founded in 1965, the Museum houses encyclopedic collections, including works dating from prehistory to the present day, in its Archaeology, Fine Arts, and Jewish Art and Life Wings, and features the most extensive holdings of biblical and Holy Land archaeology in the world. In just 45 years, thanks to a legacy of gifts and generous support from its circle of patrons worldwide, the Museum has built a far-ranging collection of nearly 500,000 objects, representing the full scope of world material culture.

In the summer of 2010, the Israel Museum completed the most comprehensive upgrade of its 20-acre campus in its history, featuring new galleries, entrance facilities, and public spaces. The three-year expansion and renewal project was designed to enhance visitor experience of the Museum’s collections, architecture, and surrounding landscape, complementing its original design by Alfred Mansfeld and Dora Gad. Led by James Carpenter Design Associates of New York and Efrat-Kowalsky Architects of Tel Aviv, the project also included the complete renewal and reconfiguration of the Museum’s Samuel and Saidye Bronfman Archaeology Wing, Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing, and Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Wing for Jewish Art and Life.

Among the highlights of the Museum’s original campus is the Shrine of the Book, designed by Armand Bartos and Frederick Kiesler, which houses the Dead Sea Scrolls, the oldest biblical manuscripts in the world, as well as rare early medieval biblical manuscripts. Adjacent to the Shrine is the Model of Jerusalem in the Second Temple Period, which reconstructs the topography and architectural character of the city as it was prior to its destruction by the Romans in 66 CE, and provides historical context to the Shrine’s presentation of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

The Museum’s celebrated Billy Rose Art Garden, designed for the original campus by Japanese-American sculptor Isamu Noguchi, is counted among the finest outdoor sculpture settings of the 20th century. An Oriental landscape combined with an ancient Jerusalem hillside, the garden serves as the backdrop for the Israel Museum’s display of the evolution of the modern western sculptural tradition. On view are works by modern masters including Jacques Lipchitz, Henry Moore, Claes Oldenburg, Pablo Picasso, Auguste Rodin, and David Smith, together with more recent site-specific commissions by such artists as Magdalena Abakanowicz, Mark Dion, James Turrell, and Micha Ullman.

The Ruth Youth Wing for Art Education, unique in its size and scope of activities, presents a wide range of programming to more than 100,000 schoolchildren each year, and features exhibition galleries, art studios, classrooms, a library of illustrated children’s books, and a recycling room. Special programs foster intercultural understanding between Arab and Jewish students and reach out to the wide spectrum of Israel’s communities.

In addition to the extensive programming offered on its main campus, the Israel Museum also operates two off-site locations: the Rockefeller Archaeological Museum, an architectural gem built in 1938 for the display of archaeology from ancient Israel; and Ticho House, which offers an ongoing program of exhibitions by younger Israeli artists in a historic house and garden setting.

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Contacts:

Israel:
The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
PO Box 71117
Jerusalem 9171002
Dena Scher Bartra, Foreign Press Officer
denasc@imj.org.il Tel: 972-2-6708935

Israel Press Office
Tel: 02-670-8868
Fax: 02-670-8063

USA:
Resnicow Schroeder Associates, Inc.
Tel: 212-5950515
Fax: 212-5958354
Leah Sandals / Jocelyn London
lsandals / jlondon@resnicowschroeder.com
212-6715154 / 5157

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