The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
   Press Releases 2010  
Press Releases 2010
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About the Israel Museum, Jerusalem

The Israel Museum is the largest cultural institution in the State of Israel and is ranked among the world’s leading art and archaeology museums. Founded in 1965, the Museum houses encyclopedic collections, including works dating from prehistory to the present day, in its Archaeology, Fine Arts, and Jewish Art and Life Wings, and features the most extensive holdings of biblical and Holy Land archaeology in the world....More

Contacts

Israel Museum Exhibition Explores the Seasons with Works by Pissarro, Rodin, Daubigny, Sisley, and Other Masters

Israel Museum, Jerusalem, and Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego Jointly Purchase Ann Lislegaard Video Installation

Israel Museum to Launch New Arts Education Program for Jerusalem Schoolchildren, December 15, 2010

Israel Museum Presents Survey of German Artist Jakob Steinhardt Featuring New Gifts to the Museum from the Artist’s Estate

Braginsky Collection of Rare Illuminated Hebrew Manuscripts and Books Premieres in Israel at Israel Museum, December 1, 2010

Israel Museum Restitutes Drawing by Paul Klee

Over 138,000 Visitors to Israel Museum in Opening Month

Israel Museum Awards Michal Heiman First Shpilman Prize for Excellence in Photography

Israel Museum Inaugurates its Renewed Campus and Reinstalled Collection Wings on July 26

Renewed Collection Wings

Newly Commissioned Monumental Installations by Olafur Eliasson and Anish Kapoor on Display at the Israel Museum

Rare and Newly Restored 18th-Century Synagogue from Suriname on View as Highlight of Israel Museum’s New Synagogue Route

Inaugural Exhibition Still / Moving Showcases Recent Acquisitions in Israel Museum’s Contemporary Collection

Artists Zvi Goldstein, Susan Hiller, and Yinka Shonibare Curate Special Exhibitions to Celebrate Israel Museum’s Renewed Campus

Levine Photography Collection Premieres at Israel Museum

2010 Exhibition Schedule - Inaugural Exhibitions


About the Israel Museum

The Israel Museum is the largest cultural institution in the State of Israel and is ranked among the world’s leading art and archaeology museums. Founded in 1965, the Museum houses encyclopedic collections, including works dating from prehistory to the present day, in its Archaeology, Fine Arts, and Jewish Art and Life Wings, and features the most extensive holdings of biblical and Holy Land archaeology in the world. In just forty-five years, thanks to a legacy of gifts and generous support from its circle of patrons worldwide, the Museum has built a far-ranging collection of nearly 500,000 objects, representing the full scope of world material culture.

In the summer of 2010, the Israel Museum completed the most comprehensive upgrade of its 20-acre campus in its history, featuring new galleries, entrance facilities, and public spaces. The three-year expansion and renewal project was designed to enhance visitor experience of the Museum’s collections, architecture, and surrounding landscape, complementing its original design by Alfred Mansfeld and Dora Gad. Led by James Carpenter Design Associates of New York and Efrat-Kowalsky Architects of Tel Aviv, the project also included the complete renewal and reconfiguration of the Museum’s Samuel and Saidye Bronfman Archaeology Wing, Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing, and Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Wing for Jewish Art and Life.

Among the highlights of the Museum’s original campus is the Shrine of the Book, designed by Armand Bartos and Frederick Kiesler, which houses the Dead Sea Scrolls, the oldest biblical manuscripts in the world, as well as rare early medieval biblical manuscripts. Adjacent to the Shrine is the Model of Jerusalem in the Second Temple Period, which reconstructs the topography and architectural character of the city as it was prior to its destruction by the Romans in 66 CE, and provides historical context to the Shrine’s presentation of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

The Museum’s celebrated Billy Rose Art Garden, designed for the original campus by Japanese-American sculptor Isamu Noguchi, is counted among the finest outdoor sculpture settings of the 20th century. An Oriental landscape combined with an ancient Jerusalem hillside, the garden serves as the backdrop for the Israel Museum’s display of the evolution of the modern western sculptural tradition. On view are works by modern masters including Jacques Lipchitz, Henry Moore, Claes Oldenburg, Pablo Picasso, Auguste Rodin, and David Smith, together with more recent site-specific commissions by such artists as Magdalena Abakanowicz, Mark Dion, James Turrell, and Micha Ullman.

The Ruth Youth Wing for Art Education, unique in its size and scope of activities, presents a wide range of programming to more than 100,000 schoolchildren each year, and features exhibition galleries, art studios, classrooms, a library of illustrated children’s books, and a recycling room. Special programs foster intercultural understanding between Arab and Jewish students and reach out to the wide spectrum of Israel’s communities.

In addition to the extensive programming offered on its main campus, the Israel Museum also operates two off-site locations: the Rockefeller Archaeological Museum, an architectural gem built in 1938 for the display of archaeology from ancient Israel; and Ticho House, which offers an ongoing program of exhibitions by younger Israeli artists in a historic house and garden setting.

Contacts:

Israel:
The Israel Museum, Jerusalem

PO Box 71117
Jerusalem 91710
Dina Wosner, Foreign Press Officer
dinawo@imj.org.il Tel: 972-2-6708935 

Israel Press Office
Tel: 02-670-8868
Fax: 02-670-8063

USA:
Resnicow Schroeder Associates, Inc.

Tel: 212-5950515
Fax: 212-5958354
Leah Sandals / Jocelyn London
lsandals / jlondon@resnicowschroeder.com
212-6715154 / 5157

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Israel Museum Exhibition Explores the Seasons with Works by Pissarro, Rodin, Daubigny, Sisley, and Other Masters

The Four Seasons

December 28, 2010 – December 2011

Jerusalem, December 23, 2010 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, opens a new exhibition exploring the visual depiction of the four seasons in European art from the 16th century onward. The Four Seasons, on view from 28 December 1, 2010 through December 2011, examines the connection among art, mythology, and folklore in agrarian societies dependant on the cycle of the seasons. More recent works demonstrate changes in this theme's depiction by artists in modern urban society. The exhibition includes approximately 30 paintings, prints, sculptures, photographs, and porcelain figurines, drawn largely from the collections of the Israel Museum.

The depiction of the seasons has been a popular genre throughout the history of art, and especially during the Renaissance and Baroque periods, based on an academic approach that used a standard set of landscapes and symbols. In the 16th -18th centuries, painters, print-makers, and porcelain artists explored the changes in weather and the passing of time through the changes in landscape, and in man's attire, and through well-known events connected with each season, such as winter sports or summer courting.

Beginning in the 19th century, as artists more frequently left their studios to paint outdoors, the portrayal of seasons became more colorful and impressionistic, focusing less on agrarian society and more on cityscapes and urban life. The Four Seasons examines this point of transition in the history of art through works by Peter Breughel the Younger, Isaac Levitan, Camille Pissarro, Auguste Rodin, Jacob Ruysdael, Lesser Ury, and others. These works are complemented by contemporary works by such artists as Eldar Farber, Noa Shai and Yuval Yairi created in the style of the Old Masters.

Among the highlights on view are:

The New Church, Amsterdam, oil on canvas, 1641, by Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraten, the Dutch painter noted for his winter scenes of 17th century Amsterdam.
 
Scandinavian Landscape, oil on canvas, 1650, by Dutch artist Allaert van Everdingen, one of the first painters to depict nature as a Romantic experience, before the style became popular in the late-18th – early-19th century.
 
The Last Snow, oil on canvas, 1884, by Isaac Ilyitch Levitan, the eminent Russian landscapist who significantly influenced modern Russian art. This is a rare example of his melancholic landscapes.
 
The exhibition is curated by Shlomit Steinberg, Hans Dichand Curator of European Art.

Israel Museum, Jerusalem, and Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego Jointly Purchase Ann Lislegaard Video Installation

Jerusalem, December 14, 2010 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, and the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego (MCASD) today announced the joint acquisition of Ann Lislegaard’s Crystal World (after J.G. Ballard) (2006), a silent two-screen video installation from a trilogy of three-dimensional animations based on science fiction novels. Inspired by J.G. Ballard’s dystopian 1966 book The Crystal World, which tells of a landscape and its inhabitants slowly petrifying into crystal, the video installation depicts a surreal architectural landscape being overtaken by crystalline forms, and incorporates text from the novel. Like many of the artist’s works, Crystal World (after J.G. Ballard) investigates spatial perception and cognition and explores divergent narrative forms.

“This partnership allows Crystal World (after J.G. Ballard), a seminal new-media work, to be presented in the context of two unique collections and to be experienced by audiences both in the U.S. and in Israel,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “With this acquisition, the Israel Museum has added a second work by Ann Lislegaard to its collection, complementing her 2005 video installation Bellona (after Samuel R. Delany). Presented together in our renewed contemporary art galleries, these two works will enrich our contemporary collection by allowing for a fuller understanding of the artist’s investigations of spatial and temporal perception.” 

“We are very pleased to have this opportunity to partner with an international institution like the Israel Museum in Jerusalem on the acquisition of Ann Lislegaard’s video installation,” commented Dr. Hugh M. Davies, The David C. Copley Director and CEO of the MCASD.  “Crystal World (after J.G. Ballard) was a major highlight of our 2009 exhibition Automatic Cities: The Architectural Imaginary in Contemporary Art, and now joins our contemporary collection as a key new media artwork.”

Set in a gloomy black and white landscape with features reflecting the work of 20th century architects Bruno Taut, Lina Bo Bardi, and Oscar Niemeyer, and artists Robert Smithson and Eva Hesse, Crystal World (after J.G. Ballard) presents a world in flux. Viewers watch as a recognizable room splinters and multiplies, water pierces through walls, and furniture drifts by, leaving behind a destabilized, labyrinthine space filled with a blinding light that obscures discernable forms and spatial distinctions. The video installation, first shown at the Sao Paolo Biennale in 2006, is displayed on two screens running in 5:39-minute and 6:23-minute loops. The loops are played deliberately out of synch, creating the possibility for multiple narrative experiences. The installations Bellona (after Samuel R. Delany) (2005), currently in the collection of the Israel Museum, and Left Hand of Darkness (after Ursula K. Le Guin) (2008) complete Lislegaard’s trilogy of three-dimensional animations inspired by literary works.

The Israel Museum’s purchase was made possible by the Barbara and Eugene Schwartz Contemporary Art Acquisition Endowment Fund. MCASD’s acquisition was supported by proceeds from the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego Art Auction 2010.

About Ann Lislegaard

Ann Lislegaard (b. 1962) uses science fiction as a starting point for video and sound installations that explore surreal and alternative realms, where light interacts with space, time is unregulated, and rigid architectural constructs distort and become fluid structures. Lislegaard’s work has been exhibited widely in Europe and in the United States, and has been presented internationally at the Venice Biennale, Sao Paulo Biennale, and Istanbul Biennale. Her installations are held in public collections including those of The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain; and Frac Languedoc-Roussillon, Montpellier, France. Lislegaard lives and works in Copenhagen and New York. 

The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

Founded in 1941, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego (MCASD) is the preeminent contemporary visual arts institution in San Diego County. The Museum’s collection includes more than 4,000 works of art created since 1950. In addition to presenting exhibitions by international contemporary artists, the Museum serves thousands of children and adults annually through its varied education programs and offers a rich program of films, performances, and lectures. MCASD is a private, nonprofit organization, with 501c3 tax-exempt status; it is supported by generous contributions and grants from MCASD Members and other individuals, corporations, foundations, and government agencies. Dr. Hugh M. Davies is The David C. Copley Director at MCASD.

Institutional support for MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

Israel Museum to Launch New Arts Education Program for Jerusalem Schoolchildren

First grade students in the city will learn the language of art by experiencing the Museum's diverse collections

Jerusalem, Israel, December 15, 2010 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem has developed a new, innovative arts program for first grade students in Jerusalem that will be launched at the start of 2011. The comprehensive program, which introduces students to the Museum's diverse collections in Archaeology, the Fine Arts, and Jewish Art and Life, is intended for schoolchildren of various socio-cultural backgrounds including Jewish, Arab, orthodox, secular, religious and special needs. It has been designed to develop students' creativity, critical thinking skills and powers of observation, with learning taking place through guided tours at the Museum and follow-up sessions back in the classroom.

"We believe that through proper, mediated learning experiences, we can bring the Museum closer to the local community and together teach the language of art in a positive and friendly way" said Tali Gavish, Head of the Ruth Youth Wing, which has developed this unique project.  "Our hope is that this program will enrich the cultural world of these children and give them the skills to be art and Museum lovers in the future".

Students will discover the Museum's wealth of cultural treasures by participating in an experiential guided tour of the galleries based on the Guinness Book of Records. The tour will answer questions such as: What is the oldest object in the Museum?  What is the largest object? What is the heaviest? What is the funniest? What is the Scariest? With the help of a Museum guide and a specially designed workbook, children will learn how to curate an exhibition, how to decide what objects to display, and the what is the balance between objective knowledge and subjective taste. At the end of the visit, children receive a catalogue that they have created and are given activity pages to continue back at school.

The innovative program is a joint initiative of the Israel Museum and the Education Department of the Jerusalem Municipality. It will run for three years and has been made possible by a generous grant from the Russell Berrie Foundation in the United States.  8,000 students are expected to participate in 2011, with a further 22,000 participating in the following two years.

Israel Museum Presents Survey of German Artist Jakob Steinhardt Featuring New Gifts to the Museum from the Artist’s Estate

Jakob's Dream: Steinhardt in Prints, Drawings, and Paintings 

December 1, 2010 – March 5, 2011

Jerusalem, Israel, December 1, 2010 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem presents today a major new exhibition celebrating the work of Jakob Steinhardt (b.1887), one of two founders of the early 20th century Berlin Expressionist movement Die Pathetiker (The Exponents of Pathos). An influential figure in the German art world in the 1920s and 1930s, best known for his dramatic woodcuts, Steinhardt emigrated from Germany to Palestine with the rise of the Nazi regime and continued working and teaching there until his death in 1968. Jakob's Dream: Steinhardt in Prints, Drawings, and Paintings, on view at the Israel Museum from December 1, 2010 through March 5, 2011, sheds light on the artist’s highly versatile oeuvre with a display of approximately 120 prints, drawings and paintings from both Germany and Israel.

Jakob's Dream has been organized to celebrate the recent bequest of the artist’s works to the Israel Museum by the Steinhardt-Bar-On family. This gift comprises 654 prints by the artist, supplementing the Museum’s existing collection of Steinhardt’s works to form a nearly complete set of his prints, including etchings, drypoints, woodcuts, wood engravings and lithographs. In addition to the prints, the family also donated 38 other works by the artist, including drawings, hand-colored monoprints, illustrated books, and oil paintings that will also be on view in the exhibition. An accompanying catalogue has been published in Hebrew and English.

“We are grateful to the Steinhardt-Bar-On family for their generous bequest,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Museum. “This gift enriches our existing holdings of Jakob Steinhardt’s art and helps establish the Israel Museum as one of the world’s foremost repositories of the artist’s work. Our current exhibition draws from our expanded collection and provides our audience with an unprecedented look at this important artist’s range, power, and influence.”

Following his arrival in Jerusalem in the mid-1930's, Steinhardt became one of the city's leading artistic figures and an influential teacher, first in his own studio and then at the Bezalel School of Arts and Crafts. His oeuvre focuses primarily on social and biblical themes, but also explores his insightful perceptions of his hometown in eastern Germany, Bohemian life in inter-war Berlin, the life of the Jews in Lithuania's remote villages, and the neighborhoods of Jerusalem before and after the establishment of the State of Israel. Steinhardt’s expressive works clearly reflect his perception of art as a means of educating the public and transmitting political and social messages.

Among the highlights on view are:

  • Mortality, Drypoint, 1913, produced while Steinhardt was a member of the movement Die Pathetiker.

  • Jonah Preaching in Nineveh, woodcut and watercolor, 1923, an example of Steinhardt's interest in Biblical characters and his view of the importance of education through art. 
  • Returning from the Synagogue, Drypoint, 9/30, 1922

The exhibition is curated by Ronit Sorek, Associate Curator in the Israel Museum’s Department of Prints & Drawings.

About the Artist

Steinhardt was born in Zerkow, a village in eastern Germany (today Poland) in 1887. He studied art in Berlin with Lovis Corinth and Hermann Struck from 1907-1909 and later in Paris with Théophil Steinlen and at Henri Matisse’s academy from 1909 -19010. With the outbreak of World War I, he was inducted into the German army and sent to Lithuania. As a result of the war and his encounters with Lithuanian Jewry, Steinhardt became acutely aware of his own Jewish identity and introduced new themes from Jewish life to his work, alongside depictions of his secular environment in Berlin. Following his arrest and interrogation, Steinhardt fled Nazi Germany in 1933 and settled in Jerusalem.

Steinhardt was the recipient of many international awards, including the Arte Liturgica Prize at the 1959 Venice Biennale. His work has been shown in such international venues as The Art Institute of Chicago and The Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. He remained active until his death in Nahariya in 1968

Braginsky Collection of Rare Illuminated Hebrew Manuscripts and Books Premieres in Israel at Israel Museum

A Journey through Jewish Worlds, on View December 1, 2010 – April 30, 2011,
Also Features Masterpieces from Israel Museum Collection

 

 

Jerusalem, Israel, November, 2010 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, will present one of the most important private collections of illuminated Hebrew manuscripts and printed books in the exhibition A Journey through Jewish Worlds: Highlights from the Braginsky Collection of Hebrew Manuscripts and Printed Books, on view from December 1, 2010, through April 30, 2011. The exhibition marks the first opportunity for Israeli audiences to experience examples from the notable library of Swiss collector René Braginsky, which includes objects ranging from a 6th-7th century Shema Yisrael (Hear O Israel) amulet to a rare early 20th century Samaritan Ketubbah (marriage contract) from Schechem. The collection comes to Israel following an international tour, which included Amsterdam and New York. Its presentation at the Israel Museum will be complemented by related objects from the Museum’s own Jewish Art and Life holdings, providing insight into a vibrant and artistic Jewish culture around the world.

“The Braginsky Collection highlights the artistic merits of the illuminated Hebrew manuscript, throughout its history and in parallel with its literary significance to the Jewish people,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Museum. “We are pleased to have the opportunity to present these extraordinary works together with objects from our own collections, bringing to life the rich heritage of the world Jewish community throughout the ages.” 

Collector Rene Braginsky states, “I am pleased that the tour of my collection brings it now to Jerusalem—in a sense, its spiritual home—and that it will be seen in the rich context of the Israel Museum’s own holdings of important Jewish manuscripts. This is also a rare opportunity for a new generation of Israelis to enjoy this legacy of the traditions of European Jewry.”

A Journey through Jewish Worlds features 120 works spanning more than 2,000 years from Germany, Holland, Italy, Spain, and the Land of Israel. The exhibition will also broaden the audience’s knowledge of important Jewish artists, scribes, and illuminators, many of whom are unknown in the public sphere.

Among the highlights on view are:

  • A Shema Yisrael traveler's amulet, dating from the 6th – 7th century CE, inscribed with an early and unusual combination of biblical verses. It is presented alongside two singularly important items from the Israel Museum collection: a passage from the book of Isaiah from the Dead Sea Scrolls, which dates to the first century BCE and is among the oldest known Biblical texts; and a page from the Aleppo Codex, the earliest known Biblical Hebrew manuscript, from the Middle Ages. The amulet offers important rare testimony to the existence of Hebrew Biblical text during the “silent” period between the time of the Dead Sea Scrolls and the oldest surviving Medieval manuscripts. 
  • Several late 19th-century works connected to the Rothschild Family, including an especially fine Haggadah illustrated by Charlotte von Rothschild in Vienna in 1842, under the guidance of the German-Jewish artist Moritz Daniel Oppenheim, and intended as a gift to her uncle, Amschel Mayer Rothschild.
     
  • One of the most unusual manuscripts of the late 19th century—the Bouton Haggadah, copied and decorated by the artist Victor Bouton in France. Every page is illuminated with geometric designs in blue and gold, closely emulating works from a school of 16th-century Persian manuscript illumination.
     
  • An extremely rare ketubbah from Gibraltar (1830-1840) that depicts a symbolic marriage between the People of Israel and God, created for Shavuot (The Festival of Weeks). 
  • A 16th-century Italian Esther Scroll, unusual because it was illuminated by a female scribe. 

A Journey through Jewish Worlds is organized for the Israel Museum by Rachel Sarfati, curator in the Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Wing for Jewish Art and Life.

A Journey through Jewish Worlds - Highlights from the Braginsky Collection of Hebrew Manuscripts and Printed Books


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Israel Museum Restitutes Drawing by Paul Klee
To Estate of Pre-World War II Owner

Veil Dance, 1920, Received in 1950 from JRSO by the Israel Museum’s Precursor, Transferred to Magen David Adom UK

Jerusalem, September 29, 2010 – The Israel Museum announced today the restitution of the Paul Klee drawing Veil Dance, 1920, to the estate of German art collector Harry Fuld Jr. Fuld owned the work from 1932 until 1941, when it was confiscated in war-time Germany. The drawing was received in 1950 by the Israel Museum’s precursor, the Bezalel National Museum, through the Jewish Restitution Successor Organization (JRSO), established after World War II to distribute looted works of art whose owners or heirs were unknown to cultural organizations around the globe. The restitution was facilitated by the firm of the late German restitution expert Dr. Jost Von Trott zu Solz, after new research brought the drawing’s provenance to light. Veil Dance is now donated, as a part of the estate of Mr. Fuld’s heir, Gita Gisela Martin, to Magen David Adom UK, Israel’s equivalent service to the Red Cross.

Jerusalem, September 29, 2010 – The Israel Museum announced today the restitution of the Paul Klee drawing Veil Dance, 1920, to the estate of German art collector Harry Fuld Jr. Fuld owned the work from 1932 until 1941, when it was confiscated in war-time Germany. The drawing was received in 1950 by the Israel Museum’s precursor, the Bezalel National Museum, through the Jewish Restitution Successor Organization (JRSO), established after World War II to distribute looted works of art whose owners or heirs were unknown to cultural organizations around the globe. The restitution was facilitated by the firm of the late German restitution expert Dr. Jost Von Trott zu Solz, after new research brought the drawing’s provenance to light. Veil Dance is now donated, as a part of the estate of Mr. Fuld’s heir, Gita Gisela Martin, to Magen David Adom UK, Israel’s equivalent service to the Red Cross.Jerusalem, September 29, 2010 – The Israel Museum announced today the restitution of the Paul Klee drawing Veil Dance, 1920, to the estate of German art collector Harry Fuld Jr. Fuld owned the work from 1932 until 1941, when it was confiscated in war-time Germany. The drawing was received in 1950 by the Israel Museum’s precursor, the Bezalel National Museum, through the Jewish Restitution Successor Organization (JRSO), established after World War II to distribute looted works of art whose owners or heirs were unknown to cultural organizations around the globe. The restitution was facilitated by the firm of the late German restitution expert Dr. Jost Von Trott zu Solz, after new research brought the drawing’s provenance to light. Veil Dance is now donated, as a part of the estate of Mr. Fuld’s heir, Gita Gisela Martin, to Magen David Adom UK, Israel’s equivalent service to the Red Cross.

“The Israel Museum strives to serve as a model for responsible restitution, and we are pleased to do so now by restituting this work in exemplary fashion, as we have in other instances in the past,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “As part of a notable series of works on paper by Klee, Veil Dance amplified an important dimension of the Museum’s collection, which includes his masterful Angelus Novus, 1920, along with eighteen other works on paper by the artist. However, it is gratifying that, in restituting this work, it is donated to Magen David Adom UK, an organization that supports a major charitable cause in Israel.”

Veil Dance was among the works of art Mr. Fuld deposited with the transportation firm Gustav Knauer when he fled Nazi persecution in 1937, with the intention of taking his collection with him to England. In 1941, following a new law by which Jewish citizens who had left Germany lost their German nationality and property, his citizenship and assets were revoked, and his art collection was confiscated by the Third Reich. In 1948, works of art and Judaica that were identified as having been looted from Jews or Jewish communities but were heirless and unclaimed were released from their central collecting points in Germany and given to JRSO, which undertook a systematic program to distribute this cultural legacy among museums, synagogues, and other Jewish organizations worldwide. 

Veil Dance was one of roughly 250 paintings, 250 works on paper, and 700 objects of Judaica deposited by JRSO for safekeeping at the Bezalel National Museum, precursor to the Israel Museum, which, following its establishment in 1965, became their custodian. Through the years, the Museum has exhibited and published many of these works, all of which are catalogued and accessible on the Museum’s website, in order to facilitate their identification and, where possible, restitution to their original owners or their heirs. Veil Dance has been exhibited and published in conjunction with Israel Museum exhibitions throughout the past 45 years.

The restitution of Veil Dance continues the Museum’s history of responsible restitution, including most recently the restitution of two ancient Roman gold-glass medallions to the heirs of the Dzialynska Collection at Goluchow Castle in Poland in 2008. The Museum reacquired one medallion for its collection, and the second was purchased and placed with the Museum on extended loan. Among other examples in recent years, in 2005, Edgar Degas’ charcoal drawing Four Nude Female Dancers Resting (ca. 1898) was restituted to the heirs of Jacques Goudstikker, a noted Dutch art dealer who died while fleeing the Nazi invasion of the Netherlands. And in 2000, the Museum returned Camille Pissarro’s Boulevard Montmarte (1897) to the heir of Holocaust victim Max Silberberg, who placed the painting on long-term loan to the Museum.

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Israel Museum Awards Michal Heiman First Shpilman Prize for Excellence in Photography

Heiman Selected by International Jury to receive $40,000 for Research on the Use of Photography in Psychoanalysis and Diagnostic Testing

Jerusalem, September 8, 2010 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, has selected artist Michal Heiman to receive the first Shpilman International Prize for Excellence in Photography. Created in partnership with the Israel Museum, the new biannual prize aims to catalyze and support international research projects exploring theoretical and practical issues in photography. Ms. Heiman was selected from a pool of thirty-five finalist candidates from nine countries by a jury of leaders in the field—including Peter Galassi, Chief Curator of Photography at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Marta Gili, Director of the Jeu de Paume, Paris. Ms. Heiman will receive $40,000 to support her newly conceived project investigating the contribution of art to psychoanalysis, and vice versa.

Michal Heiman (b. 1954) is one of the most prolific artists in Israel today, presenting exhibitions of
photography, painting, installation, and video, drawing on her extensive research in the fields of
psychology and philosophy. The Shpilman Prize will support new research exploring the interaction between art and psychoanalysis, concentrating on the role of photography and visual imagery as frequently used diagnostic tools. Ms. Heiman will study the creators of visual psychological tests and investigate aspects of photography—among them portraiture, stereoscope, and World War I documentary imagery—that influenced and were influenced by such tests. Ms. Heiman plans to build two test boxes, 'The Unthinkable I’ – For the People of the 21st Century and ‘The Unthinkable II’ – The Archive of Simultaneous Movement, to be presented and “performed” in an exhibition that will conclude the project. The Israel Museum will also produce a publication documenting this work.

“Ms. Heiman’s project is at once innovative and cross disciplinary. It is grounded in photography, but also touches upon psychology, sociology, and perception, with a solid theoretical basis and background,” said Nissan N. Perez, Horace and Grace Goldsmith Senior Curator of the Israel Museum’s Noel and Harriette Levine Department of Photography. “We are proud to recognize Ms. Heiman with this first Shpilman Prize, particularly because of the groundbreaking nature of her project.”

Shpilman Prize submissions were reviewed by a pre-selection committee from the Israel Museum to ensure that applications complied with the prize regulations and to assess the validity of the projects proposed. Seventeen applications were brought to the consideration of a jury of international experts in the field of photography, including, in addition to Mr. Perez:
• Dr. Shlomo Lee Abrahmov (Yakum, Israel) – Artist, Researcher, and Lecturer, Holon Institute
of Technology and Shenkar College of Engineering and Design, representing the Shpilman
family;
• Mr. Peter Galassi (New York) – Chief Curator of Photography, The Museum of Modern Art;
New York;
• Ms. Marta Gili (Paris) – Director, Jeu de Paume; and
• Prof. Hanan Laskin (Tel Aviv) – Founder, Photography Department, Bezalel Academy of Art
and Design, and academic advisor to art schools and other cultural institutions in Israel.

“I have no doubt that the Shpilman Prize will be embraced as one of photography’s most distinguished honors, not least because it is designed to encourage new work,” said Peter Galassi, Chief Curator of Photography of The Museum of Modern Art. “It has an ideal home in the Department of Photography of the Israel Museum, which has grown and been enriched notably since the Museum’s early years, under the direction of Senior Curator Nissan Perez, who so ably guided the jury process.”

A lecturer and curator for the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem, the Tel Aviv University Faculty of Arts, and the Advanced Studies Psychotherapy Program at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Michael Heiman’s interdisciplinary practice includes installation, painting, photography, and video. Her work is often based on extensive research in the fields of psychology and philosophy and centers on the themes of psychoanalysis, clinical research, the history of art, politics, and the gender debate. Among her major works are the series Photo Rape (2003) and I was There (2005), as well as the video series Daughtertype (2006-2008) and Attacks on Linking (2003-2006). In 1997, Ms. Heiman represented Israel at Documenta X in Germany, where she first operated Michal Heiman Test (MHT) No. 1, arranged along the lines of the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT)—a personality test used by psychologists in which viewers react to images presented in a box. Ms. Heiman continued her testing series with Michal Heiman
Test (MHT) No. 2 – My Mother-in-Law – Test for Women, presented in France, Israel, and Japan. She is also recognized for her lectures on the British psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Wilfred Bion (1897-1979) and on the French artists Claude Cahun, Christian Boltanski, and Sophie Calle. Michal Heiman was nominated for the Shpilman Prize by Professor Hannah Naveh, Dean of The Faculty of Arts, Tel Aviv University.

The Shpilman International Prize for Excellence in Photography

Recognizing photography as a leading contemporary cultural medium, the Shpilman Prize was initiated by the Shpilman family and the Shpilman Art and Culture Foundation together with the Israel Museum with the joint objectives of stimulating, encouraging, and cultivating international research projects in photography and of broadening the range of photographic investigations which integrate theoretical issues with practical ones. The $40,000 prize is awarded by an international jury once every two years, resulting in a publication by the Israel Museum, and if suitable, an exhibition. Nominations for the 2012 prize will be accepted beginning October 1, 2011.

Prospective candidates include artists and scholars in photography with a proven record of past
achievement who intend to undertake a research project of consequence in the field of photography. Candidates for the prize must be nominated by experienced professionals in art and/or photography affiliated with non-commercial artistic, cultural, or academic institutions. The projects submitted are reviewed and judged by an independent jury of internationally recognized experts. Prize regulations are available online at www.imj.org.il/shpilmanprize.

The Shpilman International Prize for Excellence in Photography is supported by an endowment gift of $1 million from the Shpilman Art and Culture Foundation, with the goal of expanding the core activities of the Museum’s Noel and Harriette Levine Department of Photography. The Shpilman gift also matches a challenge grant from the Schusterman Foundation – Israel, which sought to encourage Israeli support by pledging $1 million toward the Museum’s ongoing endowment campaign in memory of its Founder Teddy Kollek, if matched by a donor in Israel.

Shalom Shpilman, a philanthropist and businessman based in Tel Aviv, with a long-standing interest in the promotion of photographic scholarship and discovery, is currently establishing an international photography institute, having already created a scholarship program for excellence in photography in several Israeli academic institutions. Mr. Shpilman has also recently founded the Shpilman Institute for Photography (SIP), dedicated to the promotion and dissemination of photographic knowledge.

The Noel and Harriette Levine Department of Photography at the Israel Museum

Since its opening in 1965, the Israel Museum has maintained a focus on the exploration and exhibition of photography, and its comprehensive collection marks the Museum as a leader among encyclopedic museums in developing its holdings in the medium. Over the years, through selected acquisitions, together with gifts from key donors such as Arnold Newman, Arturo Schwarz, and Noel and Harriette Levine, the department’s collection has grown to comprise over 55,000 works from the earliest days of photography to contemporary times. Areas of expertise include pioneering 19th-century practitioners and photography of the Dada and Surrealist movements, as well as in-depth representations of such historically significant artists as Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Andre Kertész, and Man Ray. The department also promotes contemporary Israeli photography through an active program of acquisitions as well as through individual and group exhibitions dedicated to the work of Israeli photographers. In addition, the department awards three photography prizes, the Gérard Lévy Prize for a Young Photographer, the Kavlin Photography Prize for Life Achievement, and the Shpilman International Prize for Excellence in Photography.

Jerusalem, – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, has selected artist Michal Heiman to receive the first Shpilman International Prize for Excellence in Photography. Created in partnership with the Israel Museum, the new biannual prize aims to catalyze and support international research projects exploring theoretical and practical issues in photography. Ms. Heiman was selected from a pool of thirty-five finalist candidates from nine countries by a jury of leaders in the field—including Peter Galassi, Chief Curator of Photography at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Marta Gili, Director of the Jeu de Paume, Paris. Ms. Heiman will receive $40,000 to support her newly conceived project investigating the contribution of art to psychoanalysis, and vice versa.Michal Heiman (b. 1954) is one of the most prolific artists in Israel today, presenting exhibitions ofphotography, painting, installation, and video, drawing on her extensive research in the fields ofpsychology and philosophy. The Shpilman Prize will support new research exploring the interaction between art and psychoanalysis, concentrating on the role of photography and visual imagery as frequently used diagnostic tools. Ms. Heiman will study the creators of visual psychological tests and investigate aspects of photography—among them portraiture, stereoscope, and World War I documentary imagery—that influenced and were influenced by such tests. Ms. Heiman plans to build two test boxes, 'The Unthinkable I’ – For the People of the 21st Century and ‘The Unthinkable II’ – The Archive of Simultaneous Movement, to be presented and “performed” in an exhibition that will conclude the project. The Israel Museum will also produce a publication documenting this work.“Ms. Heiman’s project is at once innovative and cross disciplinary. It is grounded in photography, but also touches upon psychology, sociology, and perception, with a solid theoretical basis and background,” said Nissan N. Perez, Horace and Grace Goldsmith Senior Curator of the Israel Museum’s Noel and Harriette Levine Department of Photography. “We are proud to recognize Ms. Heiman with this first Shpilman Prize, particularly because of the groundbreaking nature of her project.”Shpilman Prize submissions were reviewed by a pre-selection committee from the Israel Museum to ensure that applications complied with the prize regulations and to assess the validity of the projects proposed. Seventeen applications were brought to the consideration of a jury of international experts in the field of photography, including, in addition to Mr. Perez:• Dr. Shlomo Lee Abrahmov (Yakum, Israel) – Artist, Researcher, and Lecturer, Holon Instituteof Technology and Shenkar College of Engineering and Design, representing the Shpilmanfamily;• Mr. Peter Galassi (New York) – Chief Curator of Photography, The Museum of Modern Art;New York;• Ms. Marta Gili (Paris) – Director, Jeu de Paume; and• Prof. Hanan Laskin (Tel Aviv) – Founder, Photography Department, Bezalel Academy of Artand Design, and academic advisor to art schools and other cultural institutions in Israel.“I have no doubt that the Shpilman Prize will be embraced as one of photography’s most distinguished honors, not least because it is designed to encourage new work,” said Peter Galassi, Chief Curator of Photography of The Museum of Modern Art. “It has an ideal home in the Department of Photography of the Israel Museum, which has grown and been enriched notably since the Museum’s early years, under the direction of Senior Curator Nissan Perez, who so ably guided the jury process.”A lecturer and curator for the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem, the Tel Aviv University Faculty of Arts, and the Advanced Studies Psychotherapy Program at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Michael Heiman’s interdisciplinary practice includes installation, painting, photography, and video. Her work is often based on extensive research in the fields of psychology and philosophy and centers on the themes of psychoanalysis, clinical research, the history of art, politics, and the gender debate. Among her major works are the series Photo Rape (2003) and I was There (2005), as well as the video series Daughtertype (2006-2008) and Attacks on Linking (2003-2006). In 1997, Ms. Heiman represented Israel at Documenta X in Germany, where she first operated Michal Heiman Test (MHT) No. 1, arranged along the lines of the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT)—a personality test used by psychologists in which viewers react to images presented in a box. Ms. Heiman continued her testing series with Michal HeimanTest (MHT) No. 2 – My Mother-in-Law – Test for Women, presented in France, Israel, and Japan. She is also recognized for her lectures on the British psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Wilfred Bion (1897-1979) and on the French artists Claude Cahun, Christian Boltanski, and Sophie Calle. Michal Heiman was nominated for the Shpilman Prize by Professor Hannah Naveh, Dean of The Faculty of Arts, Tel Aviv University.Recognizing photography as a leading contemporary cultural medium, the Shpilman Prize was initiated by the Shpilman family and the Shpilman Art and Culture Foundation together with the Israel Museum with the joint objectives of stimulating, encouraging, and cultivating international research projects in photography and of broadening the range of photographic investigations which integrate theoretical issues with practical ones. The $40,000 prize is awarded by an international jury once every two years, resulting in a publication by the Israel Museum, and if suitable, an exhibition. Nominations for the 2012 prize will be accepted beginning October 1, 2011.Prospective candidates include artists and scholars in photography with a proven record of pastachievement who intend to undertake a research project of consequence in the field of photography. Candidates for the prize must be nominated by experienced professionals in art and/or photography affiliated with non-commercial artistic, cultural, or academic institutions. The projects submitted are reviewed and judged by an independent jury of internationally recognized experts. Prize regulations are available online at .The Shpilman International Prize for Excellence in Photography is supported by an endowment gift of $1 million from the Shpilman Art and Culture Foundation, with the goal of expanding the core activities of the Museum’s Noel and Harriette Levine Department of Photography. The Shpilman gift also matches a challenge grant from the Schusterman Foundation – Israel, which sought to encourage Israeli support by pledging $1 million toward the Museum’s ongoing endowment campaign in memory of its Founder Teddy Kollek, if matched by a donor in Israel.Shalom Shpilman, a philanthropist and businessman based in Tel Aviv, with a long-standing interest in the promotion of photographic scholarship and discovery, is currently establishing an international photography institute, having already created a scholarship program for excellence in photography in several Israeli academic institutions. Mr. Shpilman has also recently founded the Shpilman Institute for Photography (SIP), dedicated to the promotion and dissemination of photographic knowledge.Since its opening in 1965, the Israel Museum has maintained a focus on the exploration and exhibition of photography, and its comprehensive collection marks the Museum as a leader among encyclopedic museums in developing its holdings in the medium. Over the years, through selected acquisitions, together with gifts from key donors such as Arnold Newman, Arturo Schwarz, and Noel and Harriette Levine, the department’s collection has grown to comprise over 55,000 works from the earliest days of photography to contemporary times. Areas of expertise include pioneering 19th-century practitioners and photography of the Dada and Surrealist movements, as well as in-depth representations of such historically significant artists as Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Andre Kertész, and Man Ray. The department also promotes contemporary Israeli photography through an active program of acquisitions as well as through individual and group exhibitions dedicated to the work of Israeli photographers. In addition, the department awards three photography prizes, the Gérard Lévy Prize for a Young Photographer, the Kavlin Photography Prize for Life Achievement, and the Shpilman International Prize for Excellence in Photography.

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Over 138,000 Visitors to Israel Museum in Opening Month

Jerusalem, August 26, 2010 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem announced today that since reopening one month ago on July 26, it has welcomed more than 138,000 visitors to its renewed campus. The transformed Museum features new galleries, orientation facilities, and public spaces, as well as the complete reinstallation of its three collection wings.

The current visitor numbers are significantly higher than those counted during the three-year expansion and renewal project, and they nearly triple the attendance figures prior to the development. The numbers bode well for the renewed Museum's opening year.

Daily attendance averages about 4,500 visitors, many of whom are drawn to the reconfigured collection wings in archaeology, the fine arts, and Jewish art and life. Also popular are a series of temporary exhibitions highlighting both new acquisitions and long-held masterpieces from the Museum's collections, while two new monumental, site-specific installations – Olafur Eliasson’s Whenever the rainbow appears (2010) and Anish Kapoor’s Turning The World Upside Down, Jerusalem (2010) – are proving to be major draws for  visitors.

A full program of guided tours, family activities, and public events marking the opening, including concerts by prominent Israeli musicians, activities in the Youth Wing, and a late-night art and music festival entitled Contact Point, have attracted  very large audiences. The latter event drew 7,000 people to the Museum, while the 25th annual Kite-Flying Festival on August 17 brought in 8,000 visitors.

Over the course of the month, the Museum has seen a range of both domestic and foreign tourists, attesting to the widespread media attention given to the Museum reopening. The unprecedented media coverage, both local and international, has included articles in the New York Times, the Financial Times, Le Monde, the Neue Zürcher Zeitung, and the International Herald Tribune, as well as television features on CNN, BBC and CBN. Wire coverage was also extensive and includes articles by AP, Reuters, Bloomberg, AFP, EFE and ANSA, among others. Coverage has spread from Israel to places as far afield as Australia, Brazil, China, and India, as well as the United States and Europe. 

Israel Museum Inaugurates its Renewed Campus and Reinstalled Collection Wings on July 26, 2010

New Galleries, Orientation Facilities, and Public Spaces Enhance Visitor Experience of Museum’s Campus and Encyclopedic Collections 

Contemporary Artists Zvi Goldstein, Susan Hiller, and Yinka Shonibare
Curate Special Exhibitions Highlighting Masterpieces from the Collection

Jerusalem, July 21, 2010 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, inaugurates its renewed 20-acre campus, featuring new galleries, orientation facilities, and public spaces, on July 26, 2010. The three-year expansion and renewal project was designed to enhance visitor experience of the Museum’s art, architecture, and surrounding landscape, in complement to the original architecture and design of the campus. Led by James Carpenter Design Associates of New York and Efrat-Kowalsky Architects of Tel Aviv, the $100-million project also includes the comprehensive renovation and reconfiguration of the Museum’s three collection wings – for archaeology, the fine arts, and Jewish art and life – and the reinstallation of its encyclopedic collections.

The Museum opens its renewed galleries with a series of exhibitions highlighting new acquisitions and long-held masterpieces across its collections. In addition, to celebrate the project’s completion, artists Zvi Goldstein, Susan Hiller, and Yinka Shonibare have curated Artists’ Choices, a special three-part exhibition that juxtaposes works from all three of the Museum’s collection wings. The renewed campus will also feature two new monumental commissions – Olafur Eliasson’s Whenever the rainbow appears and Anish Kapoor’s Turning The World Upside Down, Jerusalem – which respond directly to the Museum’s site and setting.

Completing the inauguration of the renewed campus, a special week-long series of public programs and events is planned, including concerts by prominent Israeli musicians, activities in the galleries for all audiences, and a late-night art and music festival, engaging artists, writers, and performers with the renewed Museum and its landscape.

“Forty-five years after the Israel Museum first opened its magnificent campus, we have completed a renewal project that allows us to serve our public as never before,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “The most ambitious undertaking in our history, this project has yielded a truly transformational change across our site. We look forward to welcoming our visitors to the Museum’s stunning new public spaces and galleries, planned to provide a richer and more enjoyable experience of our unparalleled collections and of our powerful Jerusalem hilltop setting.” 

The Israel Museum has seen tremendous growth since the 1965 opening of its original landmark campus, designed by Alfred Mansfeld and Dora Gad as a modernist reference to Mediterranean hilltop villages. The Museum’s architectural footprint has increased ten-fold since its opening, and its collections have grown significantly throughout this time and particularly in the past ten years. The project, which broke ground in June 2007, doubles the Museum’s gallery space and grows its architectural footprint by approximately 15%, all within the Museum’s existing 20-acre campus. In total, it encompasses 7,800 square meters (84,000 square feet) of new construction and 19,000 square meters (204,500 square feet) of renovated and expanded gallery space.

Isaac Molho, Chairman of the Museum’s Board of Directors, said, “The Israel Museum’s campus renewal project strengthens the Museum’s position as one of the most important social and cultural centers in the country – giving it a standing of the highest priority in the State – and also as one of the most outstanding museums in the world. The renewed Museum will provide generations of visitors, both from Israel and from abroad, with unique experiences of the art, culture, and history of communities throughout time and around the globe.”

The project is supported by a $100-million capital campaign, which was completed in December 2009 and represents the largest collective philanthropic initiative ever undertaken for a single cultural institution in the State of Israel. The Museum is also in the midst of an endowment campaign and has raised nearly $60 million toward its $75-million goal, which will double its institutional endowment to $150 million, comprising the largest endowment for any cultural institution in the country. 

New Architecture and Design  

Designed by James Carpenter Design Associates to resonate with the original campus plan, the project’s new architecture offers visitors an integrated experience of art and archeology, landscape and architectural design. Visitors are now welcomed to the Museum through three newly constructed glass entry pavilions – housing ticketing and information, retail, and restaurant facilities. Echoing the modernist geometry of the Museum’s original buildings, these glass pavilions are shaded within cast terracotta louvered housings, designed to soften and diffuse the bright Mediterranean light while encouraging a dialogue between interior and exterior spaces across the campus.   Beyond these entrance pavilions, visitors may either ascend the Museum’s refurbished Carter Promenade or enter a newly designed route of passage, situated directly below the promenade. Leading visitors to the heart of the Museum, this enclosed route is a highlight of Carpenter’s design to enhance visitor experience and clarify circulation throughout the campus. The walkway is flanked on one side by a translucent glass wall with a water feature running along its top edge, also visible from Carter Promenade above.
 
This route brings visitors into the lowest level of a new three-story gallery entrance pavilion, providing centralized access to the Museum’s three collection wings and temporary exhibition galleries on its main floor, while also allowing visitors to reach the Museum’s uppermost Crown Plaza via its top floor. Like the new entrance facilities, the gallery entrance pavilion is a glass building housed within a terracotta louvered shade enclosure, which provides a visual counterpoint to the stone-clad facades of the Museum’s original buildings.

In addition to the creation of these new visitor facilities, the Museum reconstructed all three of its collection wings – the Samuel and Saidye Bronfman Archaeology Wing, the Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing, and the Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Wing for Jewish Art and Life – enabling visitors to navigate intuitively through the timeline of material culture, from prehistory to present day. Highlights include: a chronological presentation of the Museum’s unparalleled archaeological holdings from the ancient Land of Israel; the first permanent galleries for Israeli Art and more than double the gallery space for the extensive Modern Art holdings in the Fine Arts Wing; and a newly configured Synagogue Route at the heart of the Jewish Art and Life Wing.  

Inaugural Exhibitions

The Museum unveils its new collection galleries and temporary exhibition facilities with a series of exhibitions highlighting the breadth and depth of its encyclopedic holdings, ranging from prehistoric archaeology of the Holy Land to contemporary visual culture worldwide. Highlights include:

Artists’ Choices: Zvi Goldstein, Susan Hiller, Yinka Shonibare

Through January 2011, Harry and Bella Wexner Gallery
 
This three-part exhibition is curated by renowned artists Zvi Goldstein, Susan Hiller, and Yinka Shonibare, each of whom offers a fresh look at the Museum’s encyclopedic holdings by juxtaposing works from all three of its collection wings. Unique in its scope and character, the project showcases masterworks from across the Museum’s collections and presents a dialogue between the collections and the artists themselves.

Still / Moving

Through April 2011, Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing

Exploring the use of slow and meditative movement in a variety of mediums, including installation, video, and photography, Still / Moving draws from the Museum’s wide-ranging holdings in contemporary art and features new acquisitions and key works by such artists as Carlos Amorales, Olafur Eliasson, Mona Hatoum, Junya Ishigami, Aernout Mik, and Bill Viola. 

A Rare Gift: The Noel and Harriette Levine Collection of Photographs

Through October 2, 2010, Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing

The Noel and Harriette Levine Photography Collection is considered among the finest photography collections in private hands and was gifted to the Museum in 2008. This premiere public exhibition comprises 117 works spanning over 170 years of work in the medium.

Site-Specific Commissions

The new campus features two new monumental installations by Olafur Eliasson and Anish Kapoor, which respond directly to the Museum’s landscape and architecture, and continue its long tradition of site-specific collaborations with contemporary artists. Eliasson’s Whenever the rainbow appears, installed at the end of the Museum’s new route of passage, recreates the visible light spectrum in a series of 360 monochromatically painted canvases.  Measuring more than thirteen meters (nearly 44 feet) long, the work reads from afar as an extended continuum of color. Kapoor’s Turning The World Upside Down, Jerusalem occupies a prominent place on Crown Plaza, the highest outdoor point on the Museum’s campus. Standing five meters (thirteen feet) high, the sculpture captures both the Jerusalem sky and the landscape of the campus in its polished stainless steel surfaces.

Inaugural Events

The Museum opens its doors to the public on July 26 with a week of concerts by prominent Israeli musicians, activities in the galleries for all audiences, and a late-night art and music festival, engaging artists, writers, and performers with the renewed Museum’s galleries and landscape.  All events are free with Museum admission. Throughout this week, the Museum is also extending its opening hours, offering tours of new exhibitions and gallery installations, art workshops for children, and live music in the galleries. On Tuesday, July 27, legendary musician Shalom Hanoch will perform an evening concert in the Billy Rose Art Garden, The celebration culminates on Thursday, July 29, with an evening concert by Yehudit Ravitz in the Art Garden, followed by “Contact Point,” a night of activities throughout the campus in conjunction with the Jerusalem Season of Culture, including dramatic encounters between artists, writers, and performers with artworks in the galleries and across the landscape, and an innovative “silent party” surrounding Kapoor’s Turning The World Upside Down, Jerusalem on Crown Plaza.

Festivities will continue into the month of August with the Museum’s annual Wine-Tasting Festival and its annual Kite-Flying Festival, an Art Garden concert by celebrated performer Yehuda Poliker, and other art and music activities throughout the campus.

Capital and Endowment Campaigns 

The $100-million capital campaign for the Museum’s renewed campus represents the largest collective philanthropic effort ever undertaken for a single cultural institution in the State of Israel. It has benefited from the generosity of individuals, families, and foundations around the world and in Israel, with more than $80 million raised from some 20 sources worldwide. An additional $17.5 million in matching support has been provided by the State of Israel. The Museum has also raised nearly $60 million toward its $75-million goal for its endowment campaign, which upon completion will double the Museum’s institutional endowment to a total of $150 million. 

The international donors who contributed to the Museum’s capital campaign with individual gifts ranging from $1 million to $10 million include: Herta and Paul Amir, Los Angeles; Judy and Michael Steinhardt, New York; the Estate of Dorothea Gould, Zurich; the Nash Family Foundation, New York; the Marc Rich Foundation, Lucerne; the Bella and Harry Wexner Philanthropies of The Legacy Heritage Fund, New York and Jerusalem; and Linda and Harry Macklowe, New York. Donors in Israel, whose contributions total $10 million, include challenge grants from the Schusterman Foundation – Israel and Yad Hanadiv, the Rothschild Foundation in Israel, and matching grants from: the Federmann Family, Tel Aviv; Debbie and Erel Margalit, Jerusalem; Dina, Michael, and Oudi Recanati, Tel Aviv; Rivka Saker and Uzi Zucker, New York and Tel Aviv; and Judith and Israel Yovel, Herzliya.   The renewal and endowment of the Fine Arts Wing is supported by the Edmond J. Safra Foundation. The renewal and endowment of the Jewish Art and Life Wing is supported by Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel through the Mandel Supporting Foundations. The Archaeology Wing, originally built in honor of Samuel Bronfman through the generosity of his children, has been renewed by Charles Bronfman and his children, Stephen and Claudine Bronfman and Ellen Bronfman Hauptman and Andrew Hauptman, in memory of Saidye and Samuel Bronfman. Additional support has been provided by the Harvey M. and Lyn P. Meyerhoff Fund, Inc., Baltimore, and the Wolfson Family Charitable Trust, London. 

Campus Project Design Team

The campus renewal project is a joint initiative of the New York-based firm James Carpenter Design Associates, which led the design of the Museum’s new facilities, and the Israeli firm Efrat-Kowalsky Architects, Tel Aviv, which oversaw the renewal of the Museum’s existing buildings. A. Lerman Architects Ltd., Tel Aviv, served as project architect.
The new galleries of the Archaeology Wing were designed by Pentagram Partners, London. The design of both the Fine Arts and Jewish Art and Life Wings was directed by Studio de Lange Design, Tel Aviv. Additional design in the Fine Arts Wing was provided by Oren Sagiv and Halina Hamou.

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Renewed Collection Wings

An integral component of the Israel Museum’s campus renewal project is the complete reconstruction and reinstallation of its three collection wings for archaeology, the fine arts, and Jewish art and life, each now centrally accessible through the new gallery entrance pavilion. Merging the Museum’s new curatorial vision together with innovative installation design, the renewed galleries enable visitors to navigate intuitively through the Museum’s encyclopedic collections, following the timeline of material culture from prehistory in the ancient Near East to contemporary art worldwide.

Samuel and Saidye Bronfman Archaeology Wing

The Archaeology Wing tells the story of the ancient Land of Israel – home to peoples of different cultures and faiths – using unique examples from the Museum’s collection of Holy Land archaeology, the foremost holding in the world. Organized chronologically, from prehistory through the Ottoman Empire, the transformed wing presents seven “chapters” of this archaeological narrative, weaving together momentous historical events, cultural achievements, and technological advances, while providing a glimpse into the everyday lives of the peoples of the region. This narrative is supplemented by thematic groupings highlighting aspects of ancient Israeli archaeology that are unique to the region’s history, among them Hebrew writing, glass, and coins. Treasures from neighboring cultures that have had a decisive impact on the Land of Israel – such as Egypt, the Near East, Greece and Italy, and the Islamic world – are on view in adjacent and connecting galleries. A special gallery at the entrance to the wing showcases new findings and other temporary exhibition displays.

Highlights on view include: 

“House of David” inscription (9th century BCE), part of a monumental stele commemorating the military victories of Hazael, King of Aram. This inscription is the earliest source of archaeological evidence for the Davidic dynasty in the Land of Israel.

A comparative display of two shrines (8th–7th century BCE), one Judahite, devoid of human images, as proscribed in the Bible, and the other Edomite, rich in human images, representing gifts to the shrine by the worshipers.

The Heliodorus Stele (178 BCE), incised in Greek on stone, this inscription provides new insight into the dramatic story of Heliodorus in the Temple of Jerusalem and the events that led to the Hasmonean/Maccabean revolt, as recounted in the Second Book of Maccabees. Since its first display at the Israel Museum in June 2007, additional fragments of the stele have been discovered and are now presented together for the first time in 2,200 years.

Royal Herodian bathhouse (1st century BCE), reconstructed with the pillars, frescos, mosaics and tiles excavated from Herod’s palace at Herodion. The bathhouse, lavishly decorated and built with the latest Roman technology, includes a raised mosaic floor and earthenware piping built into its walls to provide heating for the entire room.

Hadrian’s Triumph: Inscription from a triumphal arch (136 CE), honoring the emperor Hadrian and presumed to commemorate the suppression of the Bar Kokhba Revolt. The Latin inscription, discovered in Tel Shalem, is the largest ever found in Israel and is on display for the first time.

Gold-glass bases from the Roman Catacombs (4th century CE), rare ancient medallions decorated with traditional Jewish motifs, which represent the earliest known depictions of Jewish symbols from the Second Temple to appear in the Western Diaspora.

Reconstruction of synagogue and church bemas (4th–7th century CE), an impressive new installation comparing the architectural elements of contemporaneous Christian and Jewish houses of prayer. This installation presents a synagogue bema (chancel) from Susiya and a church bema with elements from seventeen different churche

Wall painting from the Abbey of the Virgin Mary in the Valley of Jehosaphat, (12th century CE), discovered during a salvage excavation of Mary’s Tomb, next to Gethsemane. This rare Crusader-period fresco was a highlight of the Abbey, which was destroyed centuries ago, and is on display for the first time.

Mihrab from Isfahan, Iran (17th–18th century), newly installed in the Wing’s gallery for Islamic art, incorporates elaborate mosaic tiles and Qur’anic verses. The mihrab, a niche in the center of the wall facing Mecca, is the most highly ornamented area in the mosque.

The curatorial team of the Bronfman Archaeology Wing is led by Michal Dayagi-Mendels, Tamar and Teddy Kollek Chief Curator of Archaeology. Pentagram Partners, London, designed the new galleries.

Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing

The Fine Arts Wing reflects the wide-ranging, interdisciplinary nature of the Museum’s collections, encompassing works of art from across the ages in Western and non-Western cultures. The wing has been reorganized to highlight connections among works from its diverse curatorial collections, which include: European Art; Modern Art; Contemporary Art; Israeli Art; the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas; Asian Art; Photography; Palevsky Design and Architecture; and Prints and Drawings. Installations are organized to underscore visual affinities and shared themes and to inspire new insight into the arts of different times and places, as well as an appreciation of the common threads of human culture. The reconfigured wing includes the Museum’s first permanent galleries for Israeli art; more than doubled gallery space for the Museum’s extensive collections in modern art; providing meaningful connecting points between Western and non-Western holdings; and a full 2,200-square-meter (7,200-square-foot) gallery floor devoted to changing displays from the Museum’s collection of contemporary art. 

Highlights newly on view include: 

The Noel and Harriette Levine Photography Collection, comprising some 125 works spanning over 170 years of the history of the medium, is shown in its first public display since it was gifted to the Museum in 2008.

The Jacques Lipchitz Collection, in a unique kunstkammer-like display, includes thousands of artifacts from Africa, Oceania, the Americas, Asia, medieval Europe, and the ancient world. The objects, assembled by Lipchitz throughout his lifetime, are presented for the first time in the Modern Art galleries, together with works by the sculptor which they inspired.

Gustave Courbet, Jura Landscape with Shepherd and Donkey (ca. 1866), depicting Courbet’s famous donkey, Gérôme, in the “Free Country” region frequently depicted by the artist.

Alberto Giacometti, Diego in the Studio (1952), a melancholic portrait of the artist’s brother, and the first painting by this influential 20th-century painter and sculptor to enter the Museum’s collection, on display for the first time.

Ohad Meromi, The Boy from South Tel Aviv (2001), a colossal sculpture of an adolescent African boy, which communicates the dissonances between the demeaning poverty of refugee life and the majesty of the scale of the work, against the calm backdrop of the museum as a  cultural sanctuary. This 2008 acquisition is displayed in the Museum’s renewed Upper Entrance Hall.

Carlos Amorales, Black Cloud, (latent studio) (2007), a monumental installation of 15,000 black paper moths. This work, acquired in 2009, is on view for the first time in the inaugural contemporary art exhibition Still / Moving.

Cup in the form of a boy clinging to a lotus stalk, China (17th century), carved from a rhinoceros horn, is one of the most important and beautiful objects of its kind in the world. The rhinoceros, now extinct in China, was treasured for its horn, and cups made from this material were believed to neutralize poison.

Leopard head hip mask from Benin Kingdom, Nigeria (17th century), a rare pendant worn by high-ranking officials on their left hip, under a scabbard or sword. Donated to the Museum in honor of the inauguration of its renewed galleries, the mask is expertly cast in brass with copper studs inserted through an intricate process that testifies to its authenticity.

The curatorial team of the Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing is led by Suzanne Landau, Yulla and Jacques Lipchitz Chief Curator of Fine Arts. Studio de Lange Design, Tel Aviv, oversaw the re-design of the wing, with additional design support by Oren Sagiv and Halina Hamou.

Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Wing for Jewish Art and Life

The Wing for Jewish Art and Life presents the material culture of Jewish communities worldwide, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and is conceived to provide a view of Jewish life that integrates both its sacred and its secular dimensions. Showcasing the aesthetic value of objects as well as their social and historical significance, the comparative display unfolds in five themes that highlight the individual and the communal, the sacred and the mundane, and the heritage of the past, and the creative innovations of the present. The reconfigured wing includes a new Synagogue Route, unique to the Israel Museum, containing four synagogue interiors from the continents of Europe, Asia, and the Americas; a dramatic introductory display focusing on the Jewish life cycle that features singular treasures from the collections relating to the ritual ceremonies of birth, marriage, and death; a new gallery space to showcase the Museum’s holdings of rare illuminated manuscripts; and the integration of works of contemporary art and Judaica.

Highlights on view include: 

Maimonides’ Mishne Torah (15th century), a rare copy of this monumental halakhic text from Northern Italy, featuring extraordinary examples of Renaissance illumination and previously unknown legal responsa and glosses. Recently deposited with the Museum on long-term loan and restored by the Museum, the work is presented for the first time in the new manuscripts gallery, alongside other rare treasures such as the 14th-century Nuremberg Mahzor and the 13th-century Spanish bible from Soria.

Zedek-ve-Shalom Synagogue (18th century), recently restored from the once-vibrant Jewish community of Suriname and displayed as an integral component of the new Synagogue Route, featuring three other complete synagogues from Germany, Italy, and India and including important ritual objects of 17th and 18th-century Dutch heritage from the same community.

The newly restored Fishach sukkah (19th century), originally built for a family home in Fischach, Germany, and meticulously painted with scenes of rural Germany and of Jerusalem. The recent restoration process exposed new and surprising details of the sukkah’s history.

Burial society (hevra kadisha) carriage from Hungary (19th century), made of carved and painted wood, which served to carry the deceased in funeral processions. This majestic carriage exemplifies the central Jewish tradition of honoring the dead.

Ogadéro necklace and bracelets from Izmir, Turkey (late 19th century), a type of jewelry typically given to a bride by her husband or father, and often kept into adulthood as security in order to purchase a burial plot.

Man’s hooded cape (akhnif) from the Atlas Mountains (late 19th–early 20th centuries), a standard garment worn by both Muslims and Jews. Unique to the collection, the cape was typically black with an intricate woven pattern on the back. Jews were required to wear the garment inside-out to signal their religion, in accordance with local law, and could only expose the stunning pattern by rolling up their sleeves.

Bezalel Arts and Crafts from the Alan and Riva Slifka Collection (early 20th century), created by artists working in Jerusalem during the first Bezalel period. Objects from the collection, such as Hanukkah lamps and jewelry, are integrated throughout the galleries. A standalone installation of key works is displayed at the junction of the Wing for Jewish Art and Life and the Fine Arts Wing, underscoring the critical connection of this art historical moment with its roots in 19th-century European Art and the Jewish cultural imagery that would provide the inspiration for Israeli Art in the early 20th century.

Display of 120 Hanukkah lamps from 15 countries, in a new installation that evokes the windows in which the lamps are traditionally lit during the Hanukkah holiday. The Museum’s collection of Hanukkah lamps is the most comprehensive in the world, and many are on view for the first time. 

he curatorial team of the Mandel Wing for Jewish Art and Life is led by Daisy Raccah-Djivre, Chief Curator of Jewish Art and Life. Studio de Lange Design, Tel Aviv, oversaw the re-design of the wing

  
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Newly Commissioned Monumental Installations by Olafur Eliasson and Anish Kapoor on Display at the Israel Museum

Site-Specific Works Complement Museum’s Campus Renewal Project, Opening to the Public July 26, 2010

Jerusalem, July 21, 2010 – Olafur Eliasson and Anish Kapoor have created two new monumental installations for the Israel Museum’s renewed and expanded campus, which opens to the public on July 26. Commissioned by the Israel Museum, these site-specific works have been installed as focal points within the Museum’s newly re-organized campus, designed jointly by James Carpenter Design Associates and Efrat-Kowalsky Architects.

The works include: Olafur Eliasson’s installation Whenever the rainbow appears, consisting of 360 individual paintings that represent in paint on canvas the progression of colors in the spectrum of light visible to the human eye. Measuring a total of 2.3 x 13.4 meters (7.5 x 43.8 feet), the work reads from afar as an extended continuum of color. It is installed at the end of the Museum’s newly designed route of passage, an enclosed walkway bridging the Museum entrance with a newly centralized gallery entrance pavilion at the heart of the campus.
 
Anish Kapoor’s site-specific sculpture Turning the World Upside Down, Jerusalem, made of polished stainless steel, takes the shape of a 5-meter-tall (16.4-foot) hourglass. Anchoring the Museum’s outdoor Crown Plaza, at the highest point on its campus, this monumental work responds to the duality of Jerusalem, inverting reflections on its curved and mirrored surface of Jerusalem’s sky and of the Museum’s built landscape.

“Eliasson and Kapoor are recognized for creating visually striking works that inspire engagement, interaction, and awe – and we are thrilled to have worked with them on two exceptional commissions for our renewed campus,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “These new works enhance the experience of our visitors with our unique site, setting, and architecture, while also continuing our notable history of engaging with contemporary artists.”

Olafur Eliasson, Whenever the rainbow appears (2010)

Olafur Eliasson’s site-specific installation Whenever the rainbow appears recreates the colors of the light spectrum visible to the human eye in a series of 360 hand-painted canvases, each measuring 230 x 3.7 centimeters (90.5 x 1.5 inches). Extending a total of 13.4 meters (43.8 feet) in length, the work is emblematic of Eliasson’s focus on the power of light in its relationship with site and setting.

Whenever the rainbow appears links two important new buildings in the Museum’s redesigned campus: the enclosed route of passage, which leads visitors from the Museum’s main entry to the heart of its campus, and its new gallery entrance pavilion, which provides centralized access to the Museum’s collection and exhibition galleries. From afar, Eliasson’s installation appears to be an extended continuum of color. As visitors approach the work at the terminus of the route of passage, the installation breaks into its individual monochromatic canvases.

Known for manipulating elemental and ephemeral materials, Eliasson works in a variety of mediums, including sculpture, photography, and – most notably – large-scale, immersive environments. Whenever the rainbow appears joins another important work by Eliasson already in the Museum’s collection, the light installation Your activity horizon (2004). Whenever the rainbow appears is a gift of Alice and Thomas Tisch, New York, on the occasion of the Museum’s 45th anniversary in 2010, and in celebration of the completion of its campus project.

Anish Kapoor, Turning the World Upside Down, Jerusalem (2010)

Standing 5 meters (16.4 feet) high, Anish Kapoor’s Turning the World Upside Down, Jerusalem occupies a prominent place at the apex of Carter Promenade on the renewed Crown Plaza, the highest outdoor point on the Museum’s campus. The sculpture’s reflective surface captures both the Jerusalem sky and the landscape of the Museum’s campus, heightening awareness of these dual images by inverting them to present the sky below and the built landscape overhead. This contrast of earthly and heavenly forms evokes Jerusalem’s mythical duality, and the sculpture’s curved form resonates with the landmark architecture of the Shrine of the Book at the entrance to the Museum campus.

The mirrored finish and scale of Turning the World Upside Down, Jerusalem are emblematic of one of the London-based artist’s distinctive styles, using simple, reflective forms to embrace and engage his viewers. It represents the second of Kapoor’s works to enter the Museum’s collection, following Black Earth (1984).

This sculpture was commissioned in memory of Teddy Kollek, longtime Mayor of Jerusalem and the Museum’s founder, in tribute to his vision for the Museum’s site and setting. The commission has been made possible through the generosity of: Charles Bronfman, New York; Richard Goldman, San Francisco; and Lily Safra, Monaco; with additional support from the Museum’s Barbara and Eugene Schwartz Contemporary Art Acquisition Endowment Fund.

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Rare and Newly Restored 18th-Century Synagogue from Suriname on View as Highlight of Israel Museum’s New Synagogue Route

New Route Showcases Four Original Synagogue Interiors from around the World

Jerusalem, July 21, 2010  - A newly restored 18th-century synagogue from Suriname – one of only two remaining examples – is on public view for the first time in Jerusalem as a highlight of the Israel Museum’s newly installed Mandel Wing for Jewish Art and Life. This rare and striking South American synagogue stands alongside synagogue interiors from Italy, Germany, and India, as part of the Museum’s new Synagogue Route, which offers visitors the opportunity for a rich experience with Jewish ritual traditions from around the world. On display with its original furniture, decorations, and sand floor, the Tzedek ve-Shalom Synagogue offers visitors a glimpse into Suriname’s once vibrant Jewish community.

Built in 1736 in the capital city of Paramaribo, Suriname, Tzedek ve-Shalom ceased to function as a place of worship in the 1990s. In order to rescue this important example of the Jewish life in this remote Jewish community, the Israel Museum approached its leaders with the aim of restoring and preserving the synagogue on its campus for the benefit of future generations of visitors from around the world. The synagogue’s interior and its original ceremonial objects and furnishings were transferred to the Museum in 1999, where it has now been meticulously refurbished.

“The addition of the Tzedek ve-Shalom Synagogue to our galleries makes the Israel Museum the only museum worldwide where visitors can see together in one venue four original synagogues from three continents,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “We are thrilled to be able to offer this immersive experience with Jewish culture and history and to enhance our exceptional holdings in Jewish Art and Life with this stunning addition.”

Suriname’s Jewish community took root in the mid-17th century, when Jews of Spanish and Portuguese origin who had fled to Holland during the Inquisition immigrated to Suriname among the country’s earliest European settlers. Tzedek ve-Shalom is typical of Spanish and Portuguese synagogues in the New World and is one of the earliest such examples from the region. Directly inspired by the Esnoga, the great Portuguese synagogue of Amsterdam, its structure integrates traditional European design with local architectural features such as a simple, symmetrical structure; white walls and large windows that invite sunlight; and a sand-coated floor. Majestic brass chandeliers of Dutch manufacture hang from the ceiling.

The installation of the Suriname synagogue is part of the larger reorganization and reinstallation of all of the Israel Museum’s collection gallery wings. Combining its Judaica and Jewish Ethnography collections, the new Mandel Wing for Jewish Art and Life leads visitors through the daily and ritual markers of the Jewish calendar from cultures around the world, with installations that explore the aesthetic value of individual objects and displays, as well as their social and historical contexts. The new Synagogue Route, curated by Tania Coen-Uzzielli, Curator of the Skirball Department of Judaica, comprises four synagogue interiors, with related ritual objects displayed within each space and along the adjacent route. In addition to the Tzedek ve-Shalom Synagogue, the route features:

The 16th century Kadavumbagam (“by the side of the landing place”) Synagogue, from Cochin, India, whose carved wooden interior includes motifs like those found in surrounding mosques and Hindu temples;

An 18th century Italian Baroque synagogue from the small town of Vittorio Veneto in Northern Italy, which served a small local Ashkenazi community that settled in the area during the Middle Ages and was abandoned when the Jewish community moved to larger urban centers in the 19th century;

A 1735 synagogue from the market town of Horb in Southern Germany, the only surviving example of the region’s painted wooden synagogues, which later served as a barn before it was rediscovered and transferred to the Israel Museum in 1970.

Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Wing for Jewish Art and Life

The Museum’s new Jewish Art and Life Wing presents selections from its comprehensive collections of Judaica and Jewish Ethnography. Supported by a $12-million gift from Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel through the Mandel Supporting Foundations, the reinstalled Wing is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of Jewish cultural traditions from the Middle Ages to the present day, integrating the sacred and secular dimensions of life throughout the Jewish world. Five main themes lead visitors through the daily and ritual markers of the Jewish calendar, with installations that highlight the aesthetic value of individual objects together with their social and historical contexts. Contemporary Judaica and works of art by contemporary Israeli artists enhance the presentation. The reinstallation of the Wing, along with that of the rest of its collection, is a central component of the Museum’s campus renewal project.

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Inaugural Exhibition Still / Moving Showcases Recent Acquisitions in Israel Museum’s Contemporary Collection

Still Moving Exhibition Explores Theme of Movement across Artistic Mediums with Works by Carlos Amorales, Mona Hatoum, Junya Ishigami, Bill Viola, Among Others

 Jerusalem, July 21, 2010 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, inaugurates the contemporary galleries of its new Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing with Still / Moving, an exhibition exploring the use of slow and meditative movement in a range of mediums, including installation, video, and photography. Featuring 26 works from the Museum’s contemporary collection, by Carlos Amorales, Olafur Eliasson, Mona Hatoum, Ori Gersht, Aernout Mik, and Bill Viola, among others, Still / Moving showcases the international breadth, depth, and growth of the Israel Museum’s contemporary holdings – more than one-third of the works on view are recent acquisitions or gifts, and half have never before been on view at the Museum. The exhibition is one of a series of collection-based projects on view in the Museum’s renewed and reinstalled galleries beginning July 26, when the Museum opens its renewed and expanded campus to the public.

“With the inauguration of our renewed campus this summer, we are showcasing the richness of our encyclopedic holdings and featuring a number of exceptional new acquisitions and gifts that have recently entered our collections,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Museum. “Since the beginning of our campus project in 2007, we have added substantially to our holdings in many collecting areas, with nearly 150 new acquisitions in modern and contemporary art alone.  We are eager to share these new additions with our public, and we consider Still / Moving a highlight among our inaugural displays.”

Each of the works in Still / Moving takes a different approach to motion as a medium for stimulating contemplation, exploring the power of slow movement to fascinate and even hypnotize and the ways in which movement can modify our perception of space and our experience of individual works of art. The exhibition, on view through April 2011, is curated by Suzanne Landau, Yulla and Jacques Lipchitz Chief Curator of Fine Arts and Landeau Family Curator of Contemporary Art.

“Many artists have attempted to depict motion and to show movement over time – from Italian Futurist interpretations of a speeding automobile, through video artists’ transformation of the static image into a digital projection. Still / Moving explores how contemporary artists have approached the meditative aspect of slow movement and incorporated it into the experience of their works,” said Landau.

Still / Moving was inspired by two contemporary works in the collection that incorporate movement as a key element: Junya Ishigami’s newly acquired Table (2005) and Bill Viola’s An Instrument of Simple Sensation (1983), which has been in the Museum’s collection since 1995. Table, an ultra-thin, 9-meter-long (29.5-foot-long) steel tabletop, supported only at its two ends and adorned with a still-life of everyday objects, captivates the viewer as it undulates in slow motion. Drawing connections with the tradition of still-life painting, Ishigami’s piece is a “moving-life” that appears simultaneously to fight and cheat gravity. Viola’s An Instrument of Simple Sensation places visitors inside a metaphorical human body, centered around a monitor showing video images of an exposed and vulnerable heart whose beat reverberates throughout the exhibition space. Incorporating the experience of the observer as a component of the installation, this early Viola work features the contemplative approach to time and movement that characterizes his video art.

Other highlights of Still / Moving include:

Peter Coffin’s Untitled (Free Jazz Mobile), 2008, composed of ten musical instruments – the same selection played in Ornette Coleman’s seminal 1960 recording Free Jazz: A Collective Improvisation – hovering just centimeters above the floor. Viewers walking around and through the mobile replace the musicians, causing random movements that echo the principles of chance that are so crucial to improvisational music.

Carlos Amorales’ Black Cloud (latent studio), 2007, a monumental installation for which the artist selected 36 types of moths and replicated them in over 15,000 life-size black paper cutouts.  The black mass composed of delicate silhouettes plays with notions of beauty, wonder, attraction, and threat, and evokes one of the world’s most spectacular natural phenomena—the yearly migration of millions of monarch butterflies between Mexico and the United States and Canada.

Rivane Neuenschwander’s Look who is coming it’s me (alarm floor), 2005, an interactive floor-and-sound installation inspired by Japanese “nightingale floors” – security devices designed to make a chirping sound when they are traversed. As they step across the floor, visitors activate instruments beneath the floorboards, creating different sounds with every step and becoming aware of their own movements as an integral part of the work itself.

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Artists Zvi Goldstein, Susan Hiller, and Yinka Shonibare Curate Special Exhibitions to Celebrate Israel Museum’s Renewed Campus

Opening July 26, 2010, Artists’ Choices Showcases Nearly 700 Works from  Museum’s Encyclopedic Holdings in the Fine Arts, Archaeology, and Jewish Art and Life

Jerusalem, July 21, 2010 The Israel Museum celebrates the completion of its renewed and expanded campus with three special exhibitions curated by contemporary artists Zvi Goldstein, Susan Hiller, and Yinka Shonibare. Drawn from the Museum’s encyclopedic collections and united under the title Artists’ Choices, this three-part presentation provides a fresh look at the depth and diversity of the Museum’s permanent holdings in archaeology, the fine arts, and Jewish art and life. The three artists, each of whom also addresses the notion of how museums collect as an aspect of their own work, present deeply personal responses to the Museum’s collections through installations showcasing hundreds of objects.

On view from July 26, 2010, through January 2011 in the Museum’s new Bella and Harry Wexner Gallery for temporary exhibitions, Artists’ Choices continues the Museum’s long-standing practice of working with contemporary artists and of juxtaposing works from different eras, cultures, and mediums, to elicit visual and content-based connections among the traditions of disparate times and places. The curator-in-charge for Artists’ Choices is Suzanne Landau, Yulla and Jacques Lipchitz Chief Curator of Fine Arts and Landeau Family Curator of Contemporary Art.

“We chose to invite these three artists to approach our encyclopedic collections as a trove of readymades, encouraging them to mine our collection riches to reveal – from their personal and individual perspectives – meaningful dialogues among the works that would stimulate our visitors,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. “Juxtaposing objects from past and present and from near and distant cultures, this special series serves as a dynamic complement to the more systematic narrative of world culture that our reinstalled collection galleries now present.”

Zvi Goldstein: Haunted by Objects

Israeli artist Zvi Goldstein brings together over 400 objects – ranging from masterpieces from the collections to everyday objects found in the Museum’s offices and storerooms – in a dense floor-to-ceiling installation that challenges contemporary concepts of museum installation and curatorship. Evoking a 16th-century cabinet of curiosities, the exhibition juxtaposes prehistoric goddesses, African masks, and objects of Judaica side-by-side with Dada ready-mades by Marcel Duchamp, a sculpture by Donald Judd, and photographs by such artists as Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Harold Edgerton, and André Kertész. Interspersed among these works are sixty-two short poems from Goldstein’s book, Room #205, written following his experience hovering between daydream and hallucination in a Tel Aviv hotel room. The texts are linked associatively with the objects on view, and serve to elucidate hidden connections among them.

A self-proclaimed “object-maker,” Goldstein was attracted to the Museum’s proposition to curate this exhibition by the opportunity to explore notions of “objecthood” in the Museum’s extensive storage facilities. The objects, artwork, and photographs on view in Haunted Objects were, in Goldstein’s opinion, “rendered irreparably mute long ago by being extricated from their original geographical contexts and referential worlds.” Through new juxtapositions and textual associations in Goldstein’s poetry, the exhibition helps to redefine the objects and create new contexts. The exhibition is coordinated at the Israel Museum by Tamar Gispan Greenberg, Assistant Curator in the Department of Israeli Art.

Susan Hiller: A Work in Progress

Drawn largely from the Museum’s holdings in modern and contemporary art, American-born London-based artist Susan Hiller assembles a selection of 34 paintings and sculptures linked by a web of personal and associative threads. Within the new context of the installation, Hillel encourages the visitor to reconsider each work regardless of the original cultural meaning. The presentation includes works by a diverse group of international contemporary artists, including Christian Boltanski, Hannah Collins, Anya Gallacio, Erez Israeli, Anselm Kiefer, and Barbara Kruger.

Hiller has long had a particular interest in exploring notions of collecting and curating from an artist’s perspective. In her selection for the exhibition, she states that she was not consciously interpreting – or even understanding – individual works, but rather responding to the emotional impact each of them has on her. The exhibition is coordinated at the Israel Museum by Nurit Shilo-Cohen, Senior Curator at Large for Museum Education and Curator of Illustration, and Kobi Ben-Meir, Nordmann Family Associate Curator of Educational Projects.

Yinka Shonibare: Earth, Wind, Fire, and Water

Yinka Shonibare, raised in Nigeria but born and based in London, has chosen over 200 works from the collections to explore ways in which cultures influence one another, while also highlighting humanity’s commonalities. Grouped according to the organizing principle of the four universal elements – earth, wind, fire, and water – the objects in the exhibition are linked by associative and aesthetic relationships, as well as by the artist’s signature focus on hybrids, combining distinct and seemingly disconnected cultural elements. Four life-size figurative sculptures, created especially for the exhibition, personify the four elements and reflect Shonibare’s emblematic style of dressing figures in Victorian-era garments made from colorful “African” batik fabrics.

In curating the exhibition, Shonibare chose objects that were influenced by more than one culture, in order to express “the notion that no culture can exist in isolation” and that each reflects a multiplicity of ideas and influences.

The resulting installation creates surprising and sometimes humorous encounters among the works, which include prehistoric stone tools, Roman-period Egyptian figurines, Sinai Bedouin children’s toys, funerary gifts from Hong Kong, and photographs of synagogue interiors, as well as works by Cao Fei, Yasumasa Morimura, Man Ray, Andres Serrano, and Sharif Waked. The exhibition is coordinated at the Israel Museum by Talia Amar, Associate Curator in the Department of Contemporary Art. 

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Levine Photography Collection Premieres at Israel Museum on July 26, 2010

Never Before on Public View, Collection Inaugurates New Photography Gallery on Museum's Renewed Campus

Jerusalem, July 21, 2010 – Considered among the finest photography collections in private hands, the Noel and Harriette Levine Collection is presented in its first-ever exhibition at the Israel Museum as part of the inaugural program for its renewed campus. A Rare Gift: The Noel and Harriette Levine Collection of Photographs showcases 117 works from the collection, donated to the Museum in 2008. The collection and the exhibition span over 170 years of the history of the medium, ranging from 19th-century British calotypes to 20th-century modernist masterpieces and contemporary work, including notable images by André Kertész, Nadar, Man Ray, and Cindy Sherman, among others. Curated by Nissan N. Perez, the Horace and Grace Goldsmith Senior Curator of the Noel and Harriette Levine Department of Photography, A Rare Gift is on view from July 26 through October 2, 2010.

“We are delighted to present for the first time anywhere this extraordinary collection, which provides a comprehensive overview of the history of the medium of photography from its first years to the present day,” said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director. “Inaugurating our renewed galleries for photography, this display is exemplary of the important additions to the Museum’s encyclopedic holdings that have arrived since the launch of our campus renewal project. We are grateful to Noel and Harriette Levine for their exemplary generosity and for their unparalleled support for the strength of our program in the field of photography.”

The Levines first embarked on the creation of what became one of the world’s most significant photography collections in private hands nearly four decades ago. A Rare Gift pays tribute to their foresight, as they were among the few early collectors to recognize the promise of photography as a major art form. The Levines have been leading patrons of the Israel Museum’s Photography Department for more than twenty years, and in 2008, on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the State of Israel, they announced the gift of their entire collection to the Museum. Never before on view in its entirety outside the couple’s New York home, this extraordinary collection inaugurates the Robert and Rena (Fisch) Lewin Gallery and Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Kravis Gallery in the upper level of the Museum’s reconfigured Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing. 
The Levine Collection embraces the medium of photography as a whole, focusing broadly across periods, styles, and schools, from the 1840s through the present day.

The collection includes notable examples of vintage 19th-century photography, among them:

Iconic calotypes by the British practitioners David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson;

Early landscape photography by American masters, among them William H. Jackson and Carleton E. Watkins;

Works by important French masters such as Gustave Le Gray and Nadar; and

Signature examples of Pictorialism by Julia Margaret Cameron and Hans Watzek.

The collection also boasts an exemplary representation of classic modern and contemporary photography, including:

Early modernist works by artists such as Laszlo Moholy Nagy, Edward Steichen, Alfred Stieglitz, Charles Sheeler, and Paul Strand; and

Key images by contemporary photographers, among them David Hockney, Robert Mapplethorpe, and Cindy Sherman.

The Noel and Harriette Levine Department of Photography at the Israel Museum

Since its opening in 1965, the Israel Museum has maintained a focus on the exploration and exhibition of photography, and its comprehensive collection marks the Museum as a leader among encyclopedic museums in developing its holdings in the medium. Over the years, through selected acquisitions, as well as gifts from key donors such as Arnold Newman, Arturo Schwarz, and Noel and Harriette Levine, the department’s collection has grown to comprise over 55,000 works from the earliest days of photography to contemporary times. Areas of expertise include pioneering 19th-century practitioners and photography of the Dada and Surrealist movements, as well as in-depth representations of such historically significant artists as Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Andre Kertész, and Man Ray. The department also promotes contemporary Israeli photography through an active program of acquisitions as well as through individual and group exhibitions dedicated to the work of Israeli photographers. In addition, the department awards three photography prizes, the Gérard Lévy Prize for a Young Photographer, the Kavlin Photography Prize for life achievement, and the Shpilman International Prize for Excellence in Photography.

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2010 Exhibition Schedule - Inaugural Exhibitions

Artists’ Choices: Zvi Goldstein, Susan Hiller, Yinka Shonibare

Through January 2011, Bella and Harry Wexner Gallery

The Israel Museum celebrates the completion of its renewed and expanded campus with three special exhibitions curated by contemporary artists Zvi Goldstein, Susan Hiller, and Yinka Shonibare. Drawn from the Museum’s encyclopedic collections and united under the title Artists’ Choices, this three-part presentation provides a fresh look at the depth and diversity of the Museum’s permanent holdings in archaeology, the fine arts, and Jewish art and life. The three artists, each of whom also addresses the notion of how museums collect as an aspect of their own work, present deeply personal responses to the Museum’s collections through installations showcasing hundreds of objects. Four new works have been created by Yinka Shonibare for his exhibition, which is on view in the Museum’s new centrally located temporary exhibition facilities, Artists’ Choices is organized by Suzanne Landau, Yulla and Jacques Lipchitz Chief Curator of Fine Arts and Landeau Family Curator of Contemporary Art.

Through January 2011, Bella and Harry Wexner Gallery The Israel Museum celebrates the completion of its renewed and expanded campus with three special exhibitions curated by contemporary artists Zvi Goldstein, Susan Hiller, and Yinka Shonibare. Drawn from the Museum’s encyclopedic collections and united under the title Artists’ Choices, this three-part presentation provides a fresh look at the depth and diversity of the Museum’s permanent holdings in archaeology, the fine arts, and Jewish art and life. The three artists, each of whom also addresses the notion of how museums collect as an aspect of their own work, present deeply personal responses to the Museum’s collections through installations showcasing hundreds of objects. Four new works have been created by Yinka Shonibare for his exhibition, which is on view in the Museum’s new centrally located temporary exhibition facilities, Artists’ Choices is organized by Suzanne Landau, Yulla and Jacques Lipchitz Chief Curator of Fine Arts and Landeau Family Curator of Contemporary Art.

Zvi Goldstein: Haunted by Objects

Israeli artist Zvi Goldstein brings together over 400 objects – ranging from masterpieces from the collections to everyday objects found in the Museum’s offices and storerooms – in a dense floor-to-ceiling installation that challenges contemporary concepts of museum installation and curatorship. Evoking a 16th-century cabinet of curiosities, the exhibition juxtaposes prehistoric goddesses, African masks, and objects of Judaica side-by-side with Dada ready-mades by Marcel Duchamp, a sculpture by Donald Judd, and photographs by such artists as Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Harold Edgerton, and André Kertész. Interspersed among these works are sixty-two short poems from Goldstein’s book, Room #205, written following his experience hovering between daydream and hallucination in a Tel Aviv hotel room. The texts are linked associatively with the objects on view, and serve to elucidate hidden connections among them.

Susan Hiller: A Work in Progress

Drawn largely from the Museum’s holdings in modern and contemporary art, American-born London-based artist Susan Hiller assembles a selection of 34 paintings and sculptures linked by a web of personal and associative threads. Within this new context of the installation, Hillel encourages the visitor to reconsider each work regardless of the original cultural meaning. The presentation includes works by a diverse group of international contemporary artists, including Christian Boltanski, Hannah Collins, Anya Gallacio, Erez Israeli, Anselm Kiefer, and Barbara Kruger.

Yinka Shonibare: Earth, Wind, Fire, and Water

Yinka Shonibare, raised in Nigeria but born and based in London, has chosen over 200 works from the collections to explore ways in which cultures influence one another, while also highlighting humanity’s commonalities. Grouped according to the organizing principle of the four universal elements – earth, wind, fire, and water – the objects in the exhibition are linked by associative and aesthetic relationships, as well as by the artist’s signature focus on hybrids, combining distinct and seemingly disconnected cultural elements. Four life-size figurative sculptures, created especially for the exhibition, personify the four elements and reflect Shonibare’s emblematic style of dressing figures in Victorian-era garments made from colorful “African” batik fabrics.

Still / Moving

Through April 2011, Nathan Cummings Building for Modern and Contemporary Art, Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing

Exploring the use of slow and meditative movement in a variety of mediums, including installation, video, and photography, Still / Moving draws from the Museum’s wide-ranging holdings in contemporary art and features such artists as Carlos Amorales, Olafur Eliasson, Ori Gersht, Mona Hatoum, Junya Ishigami, and Bill Viola. Each work takes a different approach to the contemplative aspect of motion, exploring ways in which slow movement has the power to fascinate, even hypnotize, and how it can modify our perception of space and our experience of individual works of art. The exhibition is curated by Suzanne Landau, Yulla and Jacques Lipchitz Chief Curator of the Fine Arts and Landeau Family Curator of Contemporary Art.

A Rare Gift: The Noel and Harriette Levine Collection of Photographs

Through October 2, 2010, Robert and Rena (Fisch) Lewin Gallery, Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Kravis Gallery, Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing

The Noel and Harriette Levine Photography Collection, spanning over 170 years, is considered among the finest photography collections in private hands and is being presented in its first public display since it was gifted to the Museum in 2008. The collection includes works ranging from 19th-century British calotypes to modernist masterpieces and recent examples of contemporary work. The exhibition includes 117 notable images by André Kertész, David Octavius Hill, Paul Outerbridge, Man Ray, August Sander, and Cindy Sherman, among others. The exhibition is curated by Nissan Perez, Horace and Grace Goldsmith Senior Curator of the Noel and Harriette Levine Department of Photography.

Drawing Questions

Through October 2010, Robert and Rena (Fisch) Lewin Gallery, Hildegard and Simon Rothschild
Foundation Gallery, Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing

Among the fine arts, drawing is arguably the most direct connection to the artist’s thought and work processes – and thus to the miracle of artistic creativity. This exhibition presents drawings from the Museum’s collection spanning a broad range of periods and places and includes works by Avigdor Arikha, Eugène Delacroix, Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Paul Klee, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Aviva Uri, and Egon Schiele. Works are displayed according to such themes as collage, preparatory drawings, and the boundaries of drawing. However, they are neither classified nor interpreted – the viewer is invited to experience them without explanatory intervention and to reflect on the questions they raise. Drawing Questions is curated by Meira Perry-Lehmann, Michael Bromberg Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings. 

Breaking Ground: Pioneers of Biblical Archaeology

Through April 2011, Temporary Exhibition Gallery, Samuel and Saidye Bronfman Archaeology Wing

As an introduction to the renewed Bronfman Archaeology Wing, this exhibition illuminates the connection between the artifacts on display in the Wing and the history of the professional discipline of archaeological field work in modern Israel, from 19th-century tomb raiders to modern-day excavations. Bringing archaeology to life through the individual stories of Flinders Petrie, Felicien de Saulcy, and Conrad Schick – three representative figures in the founding history of Middle Eastern archaeological exploration in the 19th century – the exhibition introduces viewers to their pioneering work in the field, as well as to the activities of the Palestine Exploration Fund. Excavation tools, archaeological findings, photographs, and drawings are among the objects in the exhibition, curated by Hagit Maoz Lin, Assistant to the Chief Curator of Archaeology.

Isaac Julien’s “Western Union: Small Boats”

Through October 2010, Focus Gallery

Isaac Julien’s ongoing exploration of the impact of location – entailing journeys across continents and cultures – culminated in the film installation trilogy True North (2004), Fantôme Afrique (2005), and Western Union: Small Boats (2007). Western Union: Small Boats conjures up the experience of North Africans attempting to escape war and famine by crossing the Mediterranean Sea. The result, reflecting four years of research, is a film experienced through an integrated three-screen projection, taking the viewer to the shores of Sicily. The installation is curated by Suzanne Landau, Yulla and Jacques Lipchitz Chief Curator of Fine Arts and Landeau Family Curator of Contemporary Art. 

Looking In, Looking Out: The Window in Art

Through February 19, 2011, Weinstein and Beningson Galleries, Ruth Youth Wing

As early as the 15th century, Leon Battista Alberti referred to the frame of a painting as an open window – the window serving as a metaphor for the world. Highlighting the Museum’s diverse collections, this Youth Wing exhibition displays objects and images that explore different aspects of the window in art, while inviting viewers on a journey through landscapes of romance, mystery and yearning. The exhibition’s theme creates a timely resonance with the inauguration of the Museum’s newly transformed galleries, creating a window into the depth and breadth of its holdings. The exhibition is curated by Hagit Allon, Senior Exhibition Curator in the Ruth Youth Wing.

Fall 2010 Exhibitions

The Four Seasons
 
October 2010 – July 2011, European Art Galleries, Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing
The depiction of the seasons has been a popular genre throughout the history of art, and especially during the Renaissance and Baroque periods, based on an academic approach using a standard set of landscapes and symbols. However, beginning in the late-19th century, with artists leaving their studios to paint outdoors, the portrayal of seasons became a more colorful affair, focusing less on agrarian society and more on cityscapes and urban life. The Four Seasons examines this point of transition in the history of art through works by Peter Breughel the Younger, Camille Pissarro, Auguste Rodin, and Jacob Ruysdael, which are complimented by works by contemporary artists such as Eldar Farber and Yuval Yairi, among others. The exhibition is curated by Shlomit Steinberg, Hans Dichand Curator of European Art.

Jakob’s Dream: Steinhardt in Prints, Drawings, and Paintings

November 2010 – March 2011, Robert and Rena (Fisch) Lewin Gallery, Hildegard and Simon Rothschild Foundation Gallery, Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing

This exhibition celebrates the work of Jakob Steinhardt, an early and noted founder of the Berlin Expressionist movement Die Pathetiker, an avant-garde group established in 1912. Following the rise of Nazism, Steinhardt immigrated to Palestine and continued working and teaching until his death in 1968. His oeuvre focuses primarily on social and biblical themes, as well as scenes from the Eastern European shtetl and Jerusalem. The exhibition displays approximately 120 of Steinhardt’s woodcuts, drawings, and paintings in honor of the gift of his artistic Estate by his family to the Israel Museum, and is curated by Ronit Sorek, Associate Curator of Prints and Drawings.

A Journey through Jewish Worlds: Highlights from the Braginsky Collection of Hebrew Manuscripts and Printed Books

December 2010 – April 2011, Focus Gallery

One of the world’s most important private collections of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books is shown to the public for the first time on a three-venue world tour culminating in Jerusalem. These masterpieces, drawn from the extensive holdings of René and Susanne Braginsky of Zurich, Switzerland, span seven centuries and include such rare masterworks as a Shema Yisrael traveler’s amulet from the 5th–6th century CE, a small silver plaque inscribed with an unusual combination of biblical verses meant to provide protection for travelers, and a 19th-century haggadah illuminated by Charlotte von Rothschild under the tutelage of the noted German-Jewish artist Moritz Daniel Oppenheim. Journey presents these among other extraordinary examples from the Braginsky collection, alongside related objects from the collection of the Israel Museum, and is curated by Rachel Sarfati, Curator in the Department of Judaica.

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